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May 5, 2015 / 16 Iyar, 5775
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Shabbos A Day With Hashem: Family Time

Niehaus-070414-Sitting

“Until I was 16 years old, my father, a traveling salesman, would be out of town all week long,” my friend Dovid related. “Really? You didn’t feel like an orphan?” I asked him. “Not at all,” he answered with a smile, “because he always made sure to spend Shabbos with us!”

Throughout the generations, Shabbos has always been the time to spend with the family. Our children long for the warmth and encouragement that only parents can give. They want us to appreciate their accomplishments and to sympathize with their hard moments. On Shabbos we can give them the time and attention they desperately need.

But is the fact that we can spend time with our families just a fringe benefit of Shabbos or an integral aspect? In the zemerBoruch Kel Elyon” (written by one of the Rishonim) we sing over and over “Hashomer Shabbos haben im habas – whoever keeps Shabbos with his son and daughter.” This implies that keeping Shabbos together with our children is something important. Then we mention a whole list of requirements for a proper Shabbos atmosphere: “b’machalei areivos, b’minei mata’amim, bimalbushei kavod… zevach mishpacha – with tasty foods, with various delicacies, with elegant garment …a family feast!” This all implies that an integral part of enjoying Shabbos is to do so together with our family – a zevach mishpacha!

Indeed, according to one interpretation in the Midrash (Tana D’vei Eliyahu) the pasuk in Tehillim (139:16), “Yamim yutzaru v’lo echod bahem – Hashem created many days, but there is one unique one,” refers to Shabbos. The Midrash explains that it is such a special day because all week long we are busy with our work, but on Shabbos we have time to appreciate our family. Once again we see that one of the reasons why Shabbos is special is because we reconnect with the family. Why is this an integral part of Shabbos?

 

Recharge Your EmunahNiehaus-070414-Walking

Shabbos is a day of emunah, when we recharge our “faith batteries.” On this day we reiterate to ourselves that Hashem created the universe in six days and “rested” on the seventh, and therefore, we do the same. We recall that Hashem took our forefathers out of Mitzrayim in order to make us His Nation. Through the miracles they saw and experienced, it became clear that not only did Hashem create the world, He is totally involved and in charge. They saw that He rewards those who obey His commandments and punishes those who don’t. On Shabbos we remind ourselves that we received the Torah on Har Sinai, which gave us the ability to fulfill our task in this world. And finally, we remember that our true purpose is to achieve the ultimate reward of Olam Habah. As we have explained in previous articles, each of these basic tenets can be strengthened through different aspects of Shabbos.

Not only must we make sure that we remain steadfast in our faith, we also need to ensure that our children carry on the torch of faith. Merely sending them to a good Jewish day school is not enough – it is extremely important that we instill in them these ideas that are so dear to us.

The Torah (Devorim 4:9) commands us to always remember the magnificent revelation on Har Sinai and to pass it on to our children for all generations. The Ramban explains that since everyone in Klal Yisroel witnessed this revelation with his or her own eyes, and it was passed down from father to son, it will be the basis of our faith forever. It is human nature for a father to not bequeath a false legacy to his son. Since children feel their parents’ love and know that they will not lead them astray, they accept these important lessons as the absolute truth and will pass it on to their children as well. Thus, the strongest way to ensure that the mesorah will continue is to pass it on ourselves.

About the Author: Rabbi Eliezer M. Niehaus, raised and educated in Los Angeles and subsequently Yeshivas Toras Moshe in Yerushalayim, is the Rosh Kollel of the Zichron Aron Yaakov Kollel in Kiryat Sefer , Israel. He lectures for the public and is the director of the Chasdei Rivka Free Loan Gemach. He can be reached at kollel.zay@gmail.com.


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6 Responses to “Shabbos A Day With Hashem: Family Time”

  1. Shabbat Shalom Dear Friends

  2. Shabbat Shalom Dear Friends

  3. SHABBAT SHALOM ISRAEL

  4. Shalom Shalom Amen

  5. Gene Strong says:

    You can spend time with your family whenever you wish..

  6. Being with family is crucial!

Comments are closed.

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