web analytics
October 23, 2014 / 29 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance
Judaism
Sponsored Post
Meir Panim with Soldiers 5774 Roundup: Year of Relief and Service for Israel’s Needy

Meir Panim implements programs that serve Israel’s neediest populations with respect and dignity. Meir Panim also coordinated care packages for families in the South during the Gaza War.



Home » Judaism » Parsha »

Shabbos – A Day With Hashem: Greeting Shabbos – Our Bride

Niehaus-020113

The soft strands of music waft through the air as the kallah, dressed in stunning white, is led by her joyful parents to the chuppah. But something is strange here – where is the chosson? Suddenly there is a commotion in the front, as the chosson leaps over the fence and pushes his way through the crowd. Tying his tie, he jumps onto the platform, wipes the sweat off his brow and smiles to the frowning father-of-the-bride. “You see! I told you I would make it on time!” Hmmm… I wish them much luck in their marriage!

None of us would dream of acting like that silly chosson. But sadly enough, we repeat his mistake over and over. Isn’t it interesting that no matter what time Shabbos comes in, whether its at 4:00 p.m. or 7:00 p.m., we still find ourselves rushing at the last minute to greet our kallah, the Shabbos Queen? Perhaps if we understood why Shabbos is our kallah and accepted that we are really going to our chuppah, we would find it easier to accept Shabbos properly.

Who Is My Chosson?

The Midrash (Breishis Rabba 11:8) tells us (according to the Vilna Gaon’s interpretation) that Shabbos complained to Hashem: “Every day of the week has its mate. Sunday has Wednesday. Monday has Thursday and Tuesday has Friday. Who is my mate?” R’ Shimshon Refoel Hirsh explains that a mate brings out the potential of its partner. The light was created on the first day, but the luminaries that bring forth the light were only created on the fourth day. The sky and seas were separated on the second day but were not inhabited by the birds and fish until the fifth day. On the third day, the land was revealed and trees and plants sprouted forth, but they did not serve any purpose until the sixth day when the animals and human beings were created to utilize them. Thus Shabbos asked, “Who will bring out my hidden potential?”

“Don’t worry,” answered Hashem, “Klal Yisroel will be your partner. As it says, Zachor es-yom haShabbos lekadsho – Remember the Shabbos to make it holy.”We are the ones who show the holiness and greatness of Shabbos. But how?

The Gemara (Bava Kama 32b) describes the Kabalas Shabbos of the amoraim, the basis of the time-honored song Lecha Dodi. “R’ Chanina would say, let us go out and greet the kallah, the Queen. R’ Yannai would wear special clothing and say “Bo’i Kallah, Bo’i Kallah – Come Bride! Come Bride!” Rashi explains that they fondly referred specifically to the “shevisa” of Shabbos – our refraining from work – as our bride. Why is that so?

Six Days You Shall Work

Let us examine in this week’s sedra the third of the Ten Commandments (Yisro 20:8-11). “Zachor es-yom haShabbos lekadsho – Remember the Shabbos to make it holy.” How? Chazal tell us (Pesachim 106a) that this means we must proclaim the holiness of Shabbos by saying kiddush. The Torah continues, “Sheshes yamim ta’avod ve’asisa chol melachtecha – six days you shall work and do all your labors.” Why does the Torah tell us that we can work during the week? Is there a reason why we should think otherwise? And furthermore, what is the connection to making kiddush?

Perhaps we can explain with the next posuk:Veyom hashvi’i Shabbos l’Hashem Elokecha lo ta’aseh chol melachah – but the Seventh day is the Shabbos to Hashem your Lord, do not do anything that constitutes work.” We all know that Hashem provides all our needs and gives us our livelihood, and can do so even if we do not lift a finger. Nevertheless, we are commanded to do some level of hishtadlus – a means to provide the channels for Him to give to us. But lest we forget that hishtadlus is just an outward motion, the Torah tells us that when we work during the six weekdays, it must be with the realization that the seventh day is Shabbos. Through not working on Shabbos, even when it may appear to result in great losses, we instill in ourselves that He is the one who is really providing our needs. It won’t help to work on Shabbos – on the contrary, it can only hinder. Thus, even when we work the rest of the week, we bear in mind that it is only because Hashem told us to do so.

About the Author: Rabbi Eliezer M. Niehaus, raised and educated in Los Angeles and subsequently Yeshivas Toras Moshe in Yerushalayim, is the Rosh Kollel of the Zichron Aron Yaakov Kollel in Kiryat Sefer , Israel. He lectures for the public and is the director of the Chasdei Rivka Free Loan Gemach. He can be reached at kollel.zay@gmail.com.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Shabbos – A Day With Hashem: Greeting Shabbos – Our Bride”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Arabs burn tires in Shuafat neighborhood of Jerusalem.
Arab Violence in Jerusalem Forces Police to Return Law and Order
Latest Judaism Stories
Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis

Boundaries must be set in every home. Parents and children are not pals. They are not equals.

Rabbi Avi Weiss, head of theYeshivat Chovevei Torah. Rabbi Asher Lopatin will be replacing him as head of the school.

Noah and his wife could not fathom living together as husband and wife and continuing the human race

Rabbi Sacks

The Babel story is the 2nd in a 4-act drama that’s unmistakably a connecting thread of Bereishit

Bible1

Our intentions are critical in raising children because they mimic everything we parents do & think

A humble person who achieves a position of prominence will utilize the standing to benefit others.

Myth #1: It is easy to be a B’nai Noach. It is extraordinarily hard to be a B’nai Noach.

The creation of the world is described twice. Each description serves a unique purpose.

Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

Name Withheld

To the surprise of our protectzia-invested acquaintances, my family has thrived in our daled amos without that amenity, b’ezras Hashem.

Shimon started adjusting the branches on the roof. In doing so, a branch fell off the other side of the car and hit the side-view mirror, cracking it.

I, the one who is housed inside this body, am completely and utterly spiritual.

Should we sit in the sukkah on a day that may be the eighth day when we are not commanded to sit in the sukkah at all?

For Appearance’s Sake
‘Shammai Did Not Follow Their Own Ruling’
(Yevamos 13b 14a)

If one hurts another human being, God is hurt; if one brings joy to another, God is more joyous.

I’m grateful to Hashem for everything; Just the same, I’d love a joyous Yom Tov without aggravation.

Bereshit: Life includes hard choices that challenge our decisions, leaving lingering complications.

More Articles from Rabbi Eliezer M. Niehaus
Neihaus-100314

During shmittah we refrain from agricultural activities and collection of loans, and on Yom Kippur we refrain from all physical pleasures.

Niehaus-090514

Not only do we accept You as our King, it is our greatest desire that the name of Your Kingdom be spread throughout the entire universe.

When a child needs encouragement whom can he turn to?

Is the fact that we can spend time with our families just a fringe benefit of Shabbos or an integral aspect?

Now that she has entered her husband’s domain, they become extremely close.

The more we are aware of Hashem’s involvement in our lives, the more we will act accordingly.

When Hashem took us out of Mitzrayim, we received not only a physical freedom but also a spiritual one.

Such a misunderstanding would render our words worthless, for we would not be declaring that Hashem is truly the Master of the Universe.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/parsha/shabbos-a-day-with-hashem-greeting-shabbos-our-bride/2013/01/31/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: