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Home » Judaism » Parsha »

Significance Of The Smallest Book Of The Torah

When Israeli soldiers are inducted into the army they make a commitment to what is called purity of arms. In other words, they declare that even in the most difficult situations, when they must use force, they commit themselves to do so with purity, with goodness, with a sense of what is right.
Rabbi Avi Weiss

Rabbi Avi Weiss
Photo Credit: Wikipedia

The words we recite when taking the Torah from the ark are found in this week’s portion: “And it came to pass, when the ark set forward, that Moshe said ‘Rise up O Lord and let Your enemies be scattered; and let them that hate You flee before You’ ” (Numbers 10:35).

This sentence is unique in its importance as it is inserted between two inverted letters nun that almost look like brackets. The Talmud says this sentence actually constitutes a book of its own (Shabbat 116a).

In this way, it is actually the smallest book of the Torah. What truly is the meaning of this sentence? What is the relationship between the Ark and the scattering of our enemies? And, finally, what makes this sentence important enough to be recited when taking the Torah from the ark?

Ultimately the Torah is a book that reflects a system of ethics that comes from God. From that perspective, the Torah is at war against paganism and other practices that are contrary to God’s ethical systems. Thus, when we take the Torah from the ark, we declare that its very motif is to scatter those who are antagonistic to Torah to its fundamental ethical principles.

Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch offers a variation of this theme. In Nechama Leibowitz’s words: “Hirsch remarked that Moshe was aware that enemies would rise up against the Torah from the moment that it was given. Its demands for justice and altruism were bound to antagonize aggressors and tyrants and stand in the way of their design. The Torahs call to holiness would not only arouse hatred, but also active persecution.”

Just seventy years after the Shoah, this concept especially resonates. Some have actually suggested that Hitler’s hatred of the Jews was precipitated by his understanding that Judaism stood firmly against his positions. Thus, when taking out the Torah we say that the enemy who would oppose the Torah should be defeated.

Another thought comes to mind. The test of one’s ethical behavior is how we act in the most difficult of situations. One of those situations is in war itself. Therefore we see the juxtaposition between Torah and scattering the enemy. In other words, the Torah declares that when we go to war and are hopeful the enemy will be dispersed, the Torah must always be kept.

This concept has contemporary meaning. When Israeli soldiers are inducted into the army they make a commitment to what is called purity of arms. In other words, they declare that even in the most difficult situations, when they must use force, they commit themselves to do so with purity, with goodness, with a sense of what is right.

To the world we must echo the words of this week’s portion. We must declare, “Blessed is the nation that has as its army the Israel Defense Forces, which is among the most moral armies on the face of the earth.”

About the Author: Rabbi Avi Weiss is founder and president of Yeshivat Chovevei Torah and senior rabbi of the Hebrew Institute of Riverdale.


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12 Responses to “Significance Of The Smallest Book Of The Torah”

  1. Judah Smith says:

    Reflects or the real deal ? A child can understand the difference. One is Living & the other is not. Without faith, it is impossible to please GOD !!!

  2. Chag Sameach Shavuot. Happy milchik (spelling?) day lol Having some ice cream to celebrate.

  3. Chag Sameach Shavuot. Happy milchik (spelling?) day lol Having some ice cream to celebrate.

  4. Lize Bartsch says:

    It is also the beginning of a nation from whom Messiah would be born: the Savior of the world. Messiah could not be born from a people who followed the base lusts of other heathen nations who were as a result of their decadence and corruption open target to fallen angels who corrupted them even more infesting their thoughts, inventions, way of life etc. G-d wants to gather from all nations a people who worship and serve Him in all purity to His glory.

  5. Lize Bartsch says:

    The Israeli army is on the right path, there is only one way to do things and that is G-d’s way

  6. ethics involves all the killings and blood in the torah?

  7. I support Israel. However, in way too many Jewish themed posts, the Torah or god is invoked. Enough! Not interested in magic, but I sure as hell am interested in the politics.

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