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January 29, 2015 / 9 Shevat, 5775
 
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Eikev: What Does It Mean To Be A Good Person?


eikev

In this week’s parsha, Moshe tells the nation exactly what G-d wants of us, but the prophet Micah makes a similar speech many generations later and exhorts the people very differently. Why? Rabbi Fohrman takes us into Micah’s speech and explains the critical building blocks to being a good person.

About the Author: Rabbi David Fohrman is the dean of Aleph Beta Academy. He has taught at Johns Hopkins University, and was a lead writer and editor for ArtScroll's Talmud translation project. Aleph Beta creates videos to help people experience Torah in way that is relevant and meaningful to them. for more videos, visit: alephbeta.org.


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2 Responses to “Eikev: What Does It Mean To Be A Good Person?”

  1. Why the “G-D” for? Or are you ashamed of spelling it correctly?

    He should be addressed as #GOD, with a hashtag and capital letters spelt in full.

  2. Azuka Chibuzor The Jewish do not use vowels when reverting to G_D. You need to do a bit of studying.

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