web analytics
August 30, 2014 / 4 Elul, 5774
At a Glance
Judaism
Sponsored Post
Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat (L) visits the JewishPress.com booth at The Event. And the Winners of the JewishPress.com Raffle Are…

Congratulations to all the winners of the JewishPress.com raffle at The Event



Home » Judaism » Parsha »

The Three Weeks

PTI-071814

It is no coincidence that Parshas Mattos is always read during the “Three Weeks” as it relates the halachos pertaining to Arei Miklat – cities of refuge. These cities were set up as places to where an accidental murderer could flee when the relatives of the deceased wanted to avenge his or her death. What is the connection to the Three Weeks? The Mishna in the beginning of Makkos 2A explains that these cities of refuge are really a punishment of galus – exile for the accidental murderer who is banished from his home for his crime. This is the very same situation we find ourselves in – galus, banished from Eretz HaKodesh due to our sins.

Our challenge today, when we are free to practice our religion without persecution, is to feel that we are indeed in galus. Unfortunately, this year as many others, Hashem has sent us a tragic reminder of how deeply entrenched in galus we actually are.

The first time that Rav Mordechai Gifter zt”l, late Rosh Yeshiva of Telshe, visited Eretz Yisrael, he went to various mekomos hakedoshim. Rav Yerachmiel Chasid, a former maggid shiur at the Mir, asked him, “Where did the Rosh Yeshiva feel more emotional, at Kever Rachel or at the Kosel?” Rav Gifter responded, “The Kosel.”   Hearing this, Rav Chasid asked Rav Gifter to explain why most people react differently, feeling more emotional at Kever Rochel. Rav Gifter explained. “People relate to Kever Rachel because they relate to a mother crying for her children.  The Beis HaMikdash, on the other hand, is foreign to them.  I saw what was before the Holocaust – all the great yeshivos and Gedolei Yisrael. I see what we have now after the Holocaust – the incredible destruction.   That’s why I relate to the Beis HaMikdash more.”

As we approach the period of “Bein Hamitzarim,” we start to feel more restricted – we can’t take haircuts, shave or listen to music. The closer we get to Tisha B’Av, the more restrictive the laws become – no bathing, swimming, eating, laundering or eating meat.

Those who lived through the Holocaust, at least, have some connection to the Churban of Klal Yisroel on a national level.  Our generation can’t even relate to that.  We know it intellectually, but we do not feel the loss of the Beis HaMikdash on an emotional level. It’s not in our kishkes.   This is precisely why we dread the Three Weeks.

So…how do we begin to relate?

There is the famous elucidation of Rav Chaim Volozhin, who explains that when Hashem instructed Moshe to construct the Mishkan, Hashem said, “Vshachanti B’sochom –and I shall dwell in them.” Why does it say “in them” rather than “in it” – b’socha? Rav Chaim explains that the Mishkan, and later on the Beis HaMikdash, is merely a reflection of the degree to which Hashem is dwelling in each and every Jew.  Every Jew is a mishkan and the Beis HaMikdash was simply a barometer of how close every Jew felt to Hashem.

This is our connection to the loss of what we never experienced.  We need, somehow, to reach into ourselves to recognize what’s missing. How close do we feel to Hashem? Where is our relationship with Hashem? Perhaps, just perhaps, we can relate to this: whenever we feel distant from Hashem, that is the Churban.

Chazal refer to this period of time as “Bein Hamitzarim” – between the straits. This terminology is taken from a pasuk in Megillas Eicha, Kol rodfeiah hisiguah bein hamitzarim – All her pursuers overtook her in dire straits.”  Mitzarim also means boundaries and alludes to the fasts of the 17th of Tammuz and 9th of Av. The simple understanding of this verse is negative: it’s a good time for our enemies to be successful.  The seforim hakedoshim, however, have an entirely different understanding: all her pursuers, all those who pursue a relationship with Hashem specifically during this time period, will be successful! Indeed, Bein Hamitzarim is an opportune time to grow incredibly close to Hashem.

About the Author: Rabbi Baruch Bodenheim is Associate Rosh Yeshiva of Yeshiva Passaic Torah Institute, Passaic, NJ.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

3 Responses to “The Three Weeks”

  1. So hashem likes revenge, punishment ? ts ts ts ts

  2. “God, who made the world and everything in it, since He is Lord of heaven and earth, does not dwell in temples made with hands.
    “Nor is He worshiped with men’s hands, as though He needed anything, since He gives to all life, breath, and all things.
    “And He has made from one blood every nation of men to dwell on all the face of the earth, and has determined their preappointed times and the boundaries of their dwellings,
    “so that they should seek the Lord, in the hope that they might grope for Him and find Him, though He is not far from each one of us;
    “for in Him we live and move and have our being, as also some of your own poets have said, ‘For we are also His offspring.’
    “Therefore, since we are the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the Divine Nature is like gold or silver or stone, something shaped by art and man’s devising.
    “Truly, these times of ignorance God overlooked, but now commands all men everywhere to repent,

  3. Uzi Kattan says:

    Arab jackals still roam the Temple Mount desecrating G-d’s name.

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
ISIS in Quneitra
Updates from Kuneitra, Syria [video]
Latest Judaism Stories
Taste-of-Lomdus-logo

First, how could a beis din of 23 judges present a guilty verdict in a capital punishment case? After all, only a majority of the 23 judges ruled in favor of his verdict.

Of paramount importance is that both the king and his people realize that while he is the leader, he is still a subject of God.

Daf-Yomi-logo

Untimely News
‘A Mourner Is Forbidden To Wear Shoes…’
(Mo’ed Katan 20b)

Questions-Answers-logo

Question: The Gemara in Berachot states that the sages authored our prayers. Does that mean we didn’t pray beforehand?

Menachem
Via Email

When a person feels he can control the destiny of other people, he runs the risk of feeling self-important, significant, and mighty.

Needless to say, it was done and they formed a great relationship as his friend and mentor. He started attending services and volunteered his time all along putting on tefillin.

He took me to a room filled with computer equipment and said, “You pray here for as long as you want.” I couldn’t believe my ears.

On Friday afternoon, Dov called Kalman. “Please make sure to return the keys for the car on Motzaei Shabbos,” he said. “We have a bris on Sunday morning and we’re all going. We also need the roof luggage bag.”

On Chol HaMoed some work is prohibited and some is permitted. According to some opinions, the work prohibition is biblical; according to others, it’s rabbinical.

If there is a mitzvas minuy dayanim in the Diaspora, then why is there a difference between Israel and the Diaspora in the number of judges and their distribution?

Judaism is a religion of love but also a religion of justice, for without justice, love corrupts.

The time immediately preceding Mashiach’s arrival is likened to the birth pangs of a woman in labor.

Eisenhower understood that motivated men will fight much harder and longer than unmotivated men.

Who does not want to get close to Hashem? Yet, how do we do that?

More Articles from Rabbi Baruch Bodenheim
PTI-082214

Who does not want to get close to Hashem? Yet, how do we do that?

PTI-071814

Perhaps, just perhaps, we can relate to this: whenever we feel distant from Hashem, that is the Churban.

Life is what you make of it. And if our lives are defined by Torah, then these weeks of Sefira are all about making the most of it.

Eretz Yisroel’s resting during the shmittah year proclaims Hashem as the Creator of the world just as Shabbos does, for the init of time – seven – is solely connected to the creation of the world.

All the commentaries ask why Hashem focuses on the Exodus as opposed to saying, “I am Hashem who created the entire world.”

The battle on Purim was our war with Amalek; we know that Haman was a descendent of Amalek and we are commanded to annihilate that entire nation.

The Satan waits for opportunities to undo kedusha, particularly on erev Shabbos, when the potential to bring the Shechina into the world is great.

Once a person receives it, he becomes personally attached to the one who gave it to him – so attached that now he will view that person’s position as his own… and a person does not see his own faults!

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/judaism/parsha/the-three-weeks/2014/07/18/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: