It is for this reason that women recite a berachah upon performing the mitzvah of lulav or sukkah. If the exemption of women from this mitzvah – via the pasuk – rendered them completely unaffiliated to this mitzvah to the point where they could no longer recite a berachah on it, the Rishonim should have found a simple answer to their question. The Gemara needed to get the exemption from a pasuk in order to completely remove women from this mitzvah, whereas if they were only exempt based on the general rule they would still be included in the mitzvah and thus be permitted to recite a berachah on the mitzvah. The absence of this answer from all of the Rishonim is evidence that the pasuk did not completely exclude women from this mitzvah; rather, it only exempted what the general rule would have exempted.

For questions or comments, e-mail RabbiRFuchs@gmail.com.

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Rabbi Fuchs learned in Yeshivas Toras Moshe, where he became a close talmid of Rav Michel Shurkin, shlit”a. While he was there he received semicha from Rav Zalman Nechemia Goldberg, shlit”a. He then learned in Mirrer Yeshiva in Brooklyn, and became a close talmid of Rav Shmuel Berenbaum, zt”l. Rabbi Fuchs received semicha from the Mirrer Yeshiva as well. After Rav Shmuel’s petira Rabbi Fuchs learned in Bais Hatalmud Kollel for six years. He is currently a Shoel Umaishiv in Yeshivas Beis Meir in Lakewood, and a Torah editor and weekly columnist at The Jewish Press.
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