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December 20, 2014 / 28 Kislev, 5775
 
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The Curse Of Family Breakdowns


Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis

Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis

Several weeks ago I shared a letter from a heartbroken mother whose children had shut the door in her face. Time and again she tried to open that door, but despite all her attempts she did not succeed. No matter how she humbled herself and begged, no matter how many people interceded on her behalf, it was to no avail.

Subsequently, I received many e-mails from people who, to one extent or another, found themselves in similar predicaments. The question we must ask is this: How can such tragedy befall the Jewish people, who throughout the millennia were renowned for their exemplary family life?

As I write this column, we are in the closing parshiot of the Torah. In Ki Savo, a litany of curses is proclaimed. Is that the way to bid farewell to the past year of Torah readings? It does seem odd, but those familiar with Torah study know that every word, dot and syllable is a blessing, even if at first glance it appears to be a terrifying proclamation. One of the curses pertinent to our subject is “Cursed be the one who curses his father and mother.”

How are we to understand this? The answer is simple and should give us all pause. The alienation between parents and children that shuts doors is in and of itself a terrible curse. It is a curse that is self-inflicted and does not require an outside force. Can there be anything more painful for parents than to have children and yet not have them? For children to have living mothers and fathers and yet feel like orphans? If that is not a curse, what is?

Surely that should serve as a wake-up call for families who have built walls of animosity, contempt and hatred in their homes. In short, that is the catastrophe we too often see nowadays.

So now perhaps we can understand why the Torah speaks of all these horrific situations as the curtain comes down on another cycle of Torah readings. Paradoxically, through these curses G-d offers us a blessing: “Leave behind the nightmare; consign it to oblivion; bring an end to your splintered, dysfunctional family. Start a new life and open a fresh, clean page in your book of life.”

But how we are to go about this? Perhaps our first step should be to attempt to comprehend the complexity of human nature.

“The heart of man is wicked from its very start,” we read in Bereishis. Contrary to what most believe, humans are not born good, compassionate, kind, giving or respectful. These are traits that must be learned and developed from early childhood.

When Hashem proclaimed the Fifth Commandment – “Honor your father and mother” – He provided us with the tools to enact it. In contrast to animals, who soon after birth are able to go off and fend for themselves, humans many years need the loving care, devotion and commitment of their parents. This is in order that a sense of gratitude, of indebtedness, might forever be engraved in the hearts of children.

As we noted above, these traits do not come automatically. They are not spontaneous. They have to be taught, and that is an education that can only be imparted in the home. It is something that even the finest schools or universities cannot teach. Tragically, however, in our 21st century culture this is a teaching that escapes most parents. Children’s obnoxious behavior is indulged and even considered “natural.”

Just contrast the manner of child rearing of years gone by with what we see today. Yesterday, we were taught to rise for our parents and our elders; to share our goodies with relatives and friends; to speak respectfully to one and all. Expressions such as “thank you,” “please,” “excuse me” and “I’m sorry” were all a part of our vocabulary. Even as we learned to speak we were taught these words; they weren’t just token phrases.

When a parent would come home, we rose in greeting. When grandparents came to visit, we ran to the door and kissed and hugged them, and when they departed we accompanied them to the door.

It goes without saying that curse words were foreign to us, as was violent and hostile behavior. On a personal level, I would like to share with you that in our family, every Shabbos eve when our parents blessed us we kissed their hands with reverence and love – a tradition that in our generation is unheard of.

Now let us take a glimpse at the homes of today. When parents and grandparents enter the house they consider themselves fortunate if the children acknowledge their presence with so much as a grunt as they sit glued to their computers or whatever else they are absorbed in. When grandparents get up to leave after a visit, it is they who have to go up to the children to give them a kiss and say goodbye. As for curse words, they are a natural part of young people’s vocabulary, picked up from mom or dad, the media, the street, or at school.

Even in homes where parents try to insulate their children from these revolting influences, the toxic fumes of society penetrate. What is the solution?

(Continued Next Week)

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2 Responses to “The Curse Of Family Breakdowns”

  1. Karen Berger says:

    I have been reading the Rebbetzin's articles for years and I have a great deal of respect for her but I wonder whether she ever gets both sides of the story. When my children would come to me with a complaint about a sibling or a playmate, I always asked what happened before the event that triggered the complaint. People talk about familial alienation as if it happens in a vacumn. All of a sudden, a child cuts off a parent and said parent has no idea what caused this behavior. The question has to be asked. What really happened before the child cut off the parent? A bond so primal? That question has to be taken seriously and answered before any real healing can occur.

  2. Please forgive me if I misslead.the only time your ever allowed to be negative towards the ones in a form as G-D to you (as life creating) is if they blaspheme GOD

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