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July 6, 2015 / 19 Tammuz, 5775
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We Weep For The Beautiful Children Of Newtown


Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis

Rebbetzin Esther Jungreis

I am interrupting my series of columns on the power of prayer to focus, this week and next, on the atrocity that occurred two weeks ago in Newtown, Connecticut, and its repercussions.

Who among us can find the words to console the tragically stricken parents whose lives have been forever shattered? The scars are so deep and the pain so all-encompassing. There are no words of consolation that can bring relief to their bleeding hearts. Mothers and fathers who received the nightmarish news – your little girl, your little boy, was gunned down in school. In school? Children killed in school?

There are no magic words that can give these stricken parents even a moment of relief, and if anyone knows this it is we, the Jewish people; our blood-drenched history testifies to it.

I am not only referring to the Holocaust, in which untold numbers of parents saw their children slaughtered before their very eyes and children witnessed their parents disappear into the gas chambers. No, I do not have to go so far back; just look at what is happening today in Israel. It is a tiny land, a mere dot on the map, but in that little country there is always a place where sirens shriek and children have to run for their lives.

So we Jews understand pain and sorrow. We have been there and, sadly, we are still there.

We weep for the beautiful children of Newtown when we see the photographs of those precious innocent souls who before they could even embark on their lives were plucked from this world by a mad gunman. And then we see pictures of the heroic teachers, and the principal and the school psychologist, who sacrificed their lives to protect the children.

We close our eyes and we try to absorb it all, but even as we do, we hear the anguished cries of parents who will never see their children grow, who will never see their sons and daughters create their own families. Is there any word in the human lexicon that can possibly express their sorrow?

Tragically, Newtown was not a first. The list of school shootings is growing. True, this is the first time children so young were the victims. But to a mother or a father of a slain child, there is no difference if the son or daughter was 16 or 6. No matter how many years will pass, no matter how many celebrations will come, these parents will always have a terrible shadow following them. Their pain is so deeply engraved on their souls that it can never be erased.

How do we react to this hellish nightmare? How do we reign in the evil? How do we control a society that has gone mad and, wittingly or unwittingly, allowed violence to flourish?

Many government officials, individuals and organizations are calling for gun control. No doubt it is a critical first step, but we also have to recognize that it is we who have made this possible; we who have allowed automatic rifles and other deadly weapons to be so easily available.

Having said this, we have to recognize it is not only guns that kill but a culture that tolerates and feeds unbridled violence; a culture where anger, degeneracy and moral sickness have become the norm. If have any doubt, consider the Internet, and films, and TV, and the bloody video games children play from a tender age, and the rap music lyrics that celebrate evil.

And give a thought to the role models we emulate – athletes and movie stars who in increasing numbers are either addicts or abusively violent to girlfriends or wives – or both. And it’s not only in the world of entertainment that we see this decadence; sadly, it is prevalent even among those who hold the most honored positions in all walks of life.

All of this feeds an already sick and violent society. There are no controls. Anything – and everything – goes.

I happen to be a frequent flyer. It’s not to visit new sights or old ones that I fly but to see my people, to reach into their hearts and awaken the Jewish spark within. On these plane trips I work on my columns or my forthcoming book or I open my book of Tehillim – Psalms. Invariably, though, I can’t help but notice what passengers near me are watching on the screens. It’s always something drenched in violence or sick sex. This is what people young and old are absorbing as they fly high up in the sky.

Have you ever asked yourself, “How does G-d look upon us? How does He see us? Has it ever occurred to any of us that He is asking, “For this, you human beings created new technologies; for this you created and sacrificed and spent billions? For this?”

Never mind your new or latest laptop or cell phone. It doesn’t mean a thing. Instead of priding yourself in the new and latest gadget, teach yourself and teach your children to be menschen. For that is what life is all about, and if you don’t have that, you nothing.

(Continued Next Week)

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One Response to “We Weep For The Beautiful Children Of Newtown”

  1. Marc Mermelstein says:

    I think the Rebbetzin's view is a bit off on this. First, she is factually incorrect. She speaks of the easy availability of automatic weapons. First, the weapons used were semi-automatic. Automatic means the trigger is squeezed and every available bullet is fired. Semi-automatic means only one bullet goes for every time the trigger is squeezed. Automatic weapons are hard to get and require special permits from the federal government (ATF) and you must be in one of the few states that permit them. This makes me wonder whether the Rebbetzin was just ill-informed and didn't investigate for herself, or whether she's promoting an agenda and misleading her readers.

    Regardless of this error on her part, I believe the issue isn't guns (which I'll mention some of my views at the end). The issue is that our society has contradictory views on mental health. We think it's important, but we don't want to spend money on it. We don't want to make anyone feel excluded or make them feel bad so we "mainstream" people with mental and emotional disabilities. But we use that same term to get rid of aggressive or disruptive kids from regular classes. Many friends of mine who are special ed teachers tell me that the kids who are disruptive to class or fight get labeled as special ed so the regular teachers don't have to deal with them. I think we just don't accept that there are bad kids or evil people.

    I would suggest the solution to the issue (in general terms) is that we should expand the mental health system in the country. Remove the stigma from it. That means that even if someone goes for treatment, it shouldn't affect their ability to have a job or even own a gun (except, of course, if they are possibly dangerous). If we make it too restrictive, people will skip going for help. We need to address people's issues and help them in society. Treating people with aggressive tendencies as "special ed" can lead to resentment and can lead to people like this shooter in CT.

    The issue, in my opinion is simply that. Not guns. Not video games. There is no culture of violence per se. Improved mental health and parents taking an active role in parenting instead of making it someone else's problem (nannies, schools, after school programs, etc). This will help us avoid these massacres but they will never be eliminated even if guns were removed (See Dunblane, England where a taxi driver with a gun massacred people and China the past two years where there have been numerous school attacks with knives and other sharps objects).

    On the issue of guns, I think it's irresponsible as Jews to suggest removing guns or restricting them. The framers of the Constitution incorporated the right to own guns to protect ourselves from a tyrannical government. As Jews we know the need to protect ourselves. One day the government is our friend. The next our enemy. Even in recent memory, a small country called Germany was friendly to Jews. Then they required everyone to register guns. Then they confiscated the guns from the Jews. We all know what happened next. Jews were unable to protect themselves. We've been kicked out of most every country in some pogrom or another. When will we learn the need to defend ourselves and know how to fight (like Avraham Avinu taught his yeshiva to fight so they were able to go rescue Lot — or if you prefer to take the midrash literally, it was only Eliezer, but none-the-less they knew to fight)? When will we stop believing that the gov't that is our friend now will not always be our friend? If we increase gun control, we only hurt ourselves later. While this may be a mean or heartbreaking calculation, I'd rather the chance of 20 Newtowns and not 6,000,000. God willing, we'll never need guns to protect ourselves against America. In which case the massacred children are a sad loss. If we ever do, it was well worth it.

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