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March 5, 2015 / 14 Adar , 5775
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Why Are We Losing Our Children? (Part I)


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Photo Credit: Uri Lenzi/Flash90

As Jews, we are supposed to make all other Jews feel comfortable and greet them like brothers. Achdus, unity, means that we must make others feel as comfortable and accepted as we would like to feel. Fortunately, this works for the vast majority of people in most communities. True baalei chesed reach out to all Jews, no matter their beliefs, background, mental stability, or behavior. A welcomed brother is always welcomed – under any circumstances.

I don’t think I have ever met someone who loved his home, his parents, had loving memories of his school life, felt enamored with the warmth and chesed of his community and abandoned it all for the trappings of the secular world. Just like each finger finds its unique purpose on the hand, we all need to feel that we are necessary part of our homes, schools and communities. Making children feel special and creating a home of Torah that is warm and accepting is the most important factor in helping our children remain in the house of Hashem.

About the Author: Rabbi Gil Frieman is the pulpit Rabbi of Jewish Center Nachlat Zion, the home of Ohr Naava. He is certified as a shochet, sofer, and has given lectures in the United States, Canada, and throughout Eretz Yisroel. Rabbi Frieman is currently the American Director of seminaries Darchei Binah, Afikei Torah, and Chochmas Lev in Eretz Yisroel, and teaches in Nefesh High School, Camp Tubby during the summers, and lectures weekly at Ohr Naava. In addition, Rabbi Frieman teaches all tracks in Ateres Naava Seminary. He is a highly anticipated speaker on TorahAnytime.com where he speaks live most Wednesday nights at 9:00pm EST.


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One Response to “Why Are We Losing Our Children? (Part I)”

  1. As Pogo said, "We have met the enemy and he is us." The Association of German National Jews. They were no different from the many leftist Jewish groups in America today. Max Naumann leader of the group supported Hitler in the early days pushing assimilation and integration. It is the same ideology, extant here. In 1934 they stated "we have always held the well-being of the German people and the fatherland, to which we feel inextricably linked, above our own well-being. Thus we greeted the results of January, 1933, even though it has brought hardship for us personally". The liberal today no longer practices Judaism, no longer even knows what we observant Jews believe in. They are ve'echad she'eino yodea lish'ol. Past the tam. They do not even connect. His religion is secular humanism. My own mother saw these people bring Hitler to power. She says the The Association of German National Jews was just one group. There were many like minded Jews. These people will be the capos when the fascists declare a dictatorship here to promote their modern fascism; a one world government and religion, blocked only by Orthodox Judiasm and like minded Christians. Once exploited, they will be next. Like Pol Pot in Cambodia, the intellectual liberals were used, then taken. RABBI DR. BERNHARD ROSENBERG

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