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September 19, 2014 / 24 Elul, 5774
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Chol Hamo’ed Pesach

Weekly Luach - Shabbat Shalom

                                Musaf of Festivals –  we say Vehikravtem in the Shemoneh Esreh. Following the repetition the chazzan says Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, Shir shel Yom (Nusach Sefarad adds Ein K’Elokeinu) and their respective Kaddish recitals.

Mincha is usual weekday Shemoneh Esreh with inclusion of Ya’aleh Veyavo. At conclusion of repetition, Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, Kaddish Yasom.

Sunday is the last day of Chol Hamo’ed. We proceed with all the preparations for Yom Tov, Shevi’i Shel Pesach, which starts in the evening. We light candles (at 7:22 p.m. NYC E.D.T.) and recite the blessing  Le’hadlik ner shel Yom Tov (without Shehecheyanu).

Maariv: We welcome Yom Tov with the usual Festival Shemoneh Esreh of Shalosh Regalim. We count Sefiras HaOmer at the end. We recite Kiddush at home (some recite it in Shul as well) and proceed to wash for the Seuda. We add Ya’aleh VeYavo in Birkas HaMazon.

Monday morning: Shacharis for Festivals – Shalosh Regalim – including all ancillary tefillos, half hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We then remove two Sifrei Torah from the Ark. In the first we call five aliyos and read from Parashas BeShalach (Shemos 13:17-15:26) from “Vayehi Beshalach . . .” until “Ki Ani Hashem Rof’echa.” We place both Torah scrolls on the Bimah and the Reader recites half kaddish. We then call the Maftir to read in the second Sefer in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:19-25) from “Vehikravtem” until “Kol meleches avoda lo sa’asu.” We read the Haftara (II Samuel 22:1-51) from “Va’yedabber David” until “U’lezar’o ad olam.” After the concluding blessings of the Haftara, Chazzan chants Kah Keili, then Ashrei and Yehallelu. The scrolls are returned to the Aron and half kaddish is recited.

Musaf: the usual Musaf Shalosh Regalim Shemoneh Esreh with the insertion of Vehikravtem. At the conclusion of the chazzan’s repetition the Kohanim duchan. The chazzan says Kaddish Tiskabbel followed by Ein K’Elokeinu, Aleinu and Shir shel Yom. The mourners recite the appropriate Kaddish.

Mincha: Ashrei, Uva LeTziyyon, half- Kaddish, the Shalosh Regalim Shemoneh Esreh, chazzan’s repetition followed by Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu and Kaddish Yasom, then Mourner’s Kaddish.

Monday evening – Acharon Shel Pesach: Candle lighting is delayed until the first day of Yom Tov has concluded. Some light as early as 45 minutes after shekia (N.Y.C. 8:26 p.m. E.D.T.) while others wait until 60 or 72 minutes after shekia. This is the same time frame for the beginning of cooking and other preparations for the Seuda of Yom Tov Sheni. As we say Yizkor on Acharon Shel Pesach, it is customary to light Yizkor memorial candles for the departed at that time. We delay Maariv for the counting of Sefiras HaOmer. Maariv is the usual Shalosh Regalim Tefilla. Following the Shemoneh Esreh the chazzan recites Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu and Kaddish Yasom. We then count Sefiras HaOmer. At home we recite Kiddush of Shalosh Regalim – like the night before, without Shehecheyanu (some recite Kiddush in Shul as well).

Tuesday morning: Shacharis for Shalosh Regalim including ancillary tefillos, half hallel, Kaddish Tiskabbel. We then remove two Sifrei Torah from the Ark. In the first we call five aliyos and read in Parashas Re’eh (Devarim 15:19-16:17) from Kol ha’bechor” until “nasan lach.” We place both scrolls on the Bimah and the Reader recites half kaddish. We then call the Maftir to read in the second Sefer in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 28:19-25) from “Vehikravtem” until “Kol meleches avoda lo sa’asu.” We read the Haftara (Isaiah 10:32-12:6) from “Od hayom be’Nov” until “Kedosh Yisrael.” Following the Haftara blessings we place the Sifrei Torah on the Bimah, we send all the children (those who have parents) out of the shul and we begin to recite the Yizkor prayer. In most synagogues there is a custom to make a Yizkor appeal prior to the recitation of Yizkor due to the text of the prayer, which clearly states, “Ba’avur she’eten tzedaka – because I am donating to charity” (see Ta’amei HaMinhagim, Hilchos Pesach 587). We then say Av HaRachamim (due to the solemn mood we do not chant Kah Keili), Ashrei. We chant Yehalellu as we return the scrolls to Aron HaKodesh. The chazzan then recites half- Kaddish. Musaf as the day before, the Shalosh Regalim Shemoneh Esreh with insertion of Vehikravtem, and before the conclusion of the chazzan’s repetition the Kohanim duchan. Following the repetition the chazzan recites Kaddish Tiskabbel, Ein K’Elokeinu, Aleinu and Shir shelYom. The mourners proceed with Kaddish recitals.

About the Author: Rabbi Yaakov Klass, rav of Congregation K’hal Bnei Matisyahu in Flatbush, Brooklyn, is Torah Editor of The Jewish Press. He can be contacted at yklass@jewishpress.com.


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