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September 23, 2014 / 28 Elul, 5774
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Parshas Acharei Mos

Weekly Luach - Shabbat Shalom

Vol. LXV No. 15                                       5774
New York City
CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
April 11, 2014 – 11 Nissan 5774
7:11 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

Sabbath Ends: 8:15 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sabbath Ends: Rabbenu Tam 8:45 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Weekly Reading: Acharei Mos
Weekly Haftara: Ve’Arva La’Shem (Malachi 3:4-24)
Daf Yomi: Beza 12
Mishna Yomit: Menachos 9:7-8
Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 363:4-6
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Isurei Bi’ah chap.15-17
Earliest time for tallis and tefillin: 5:32 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sunrise: 6:23 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 9:40 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sunset: 7:31 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

This Sabbath is Shabbos HaGadol. Many congregations say the Yotzros of Shabbos HaGadol in the Reader’s repetition of the Shacharis Amida. We do not say Av Harachamim or Hazkaras Neshamos. It is customary to recite this Shabbos afternoon the Haggadah from “Avadim hayyinu” until “lechapper al avonoseinu.” It is a Minhag Yisrael that the Rav delivers a special sermon this Shabbos, the Shabbos HaGadol Derasha, combining Halacha and Aggada as they relate to the laws of Pesach.

 Mincha, no Tzidkosecha.

On Motza’ei Shabbos at the conclusion of Maariv we do not say Viy’hi No’am and Ve’ata Kadosh.

On Sunday evening we search for chametz – all remaining chametz, including that which might be stuck to utensils, should be sold to a gentile via the rabbi. The sale is to take place no later than the latest time at which one may yet own such chametz before Pesach (at the end of the fifth hour of Erev Pesach – we divide the daylight hours into 12 equal units called sha’ot zemaniyot). This year that time in N.Y.C. is Monday 11:36 a.m. E.D.T. We may not eat chametz beyond one sha’ah zemanit before that: this year in NYC it is 10:15 a.m. E.D.T. At the later time (when we are forbidden to own any chametz) we burn the chametz which we have gathered in the search the night before and recite Kol Chami’a and thus we are me’vatel – we nullify – our ownership of the chametz.

While we are now forbidden to eat chametz, we are also proscribed from eating matza [on Erev Pesach] until the Seder.

Shacharis, Erev Pesach, no mizmor l’soda, ve’hu rachum, Kel erech apayim, yehi ratzon or lamenatzeach. It is customary for all firstborn to fast on Erev Pesach in commemoration of their deliverance from the decree of death to the firstborn that afflicted all in Egypt. If one is unable to fast and has attended a Seudas Siyum of a Gemara tractate, usually held after Shacharis, then one may eat.

It is customary for those who need an eruv chatzeros (to allow them to carry in communal and joint driveways and courtyards) to make this eruv, once a year, on Erev Pesach, putting aside a matza for this purpose.

When lighting candles Monday evening, we bless both Lehadlik ner shel Yom Tov and Shehecheyanu (N.Y.C. candle lighting time is 7:16 p.m. E.D.T.). We recite the usual Festival tefilla for Maariv with inclusion of Vayedabber Moshe before the Amida and Kaddish Tiskabbel at the conclusion. (Nusach Sefarad include the whole Hallel both evenings – the first night and the second night – with a beracha). Congregations that usually recite the Kiddush in the synagogue on Friday nights do not do so these two evenings; instead, all wait to recite Kiddush at the Seder.

At home on both evenings we recite the Kiddush of Yom Tov and Shehecheyanu on the first cup of wine, and we continue with the Seder ceremony, the dippings, matza, maror, Mah Nishtana, the Haggadah, three additional cups of wine, and the Afikoman.

About the Author: Rabbi Yaakov Klass, rav of Congregation K’hal Bnei Matisyahu in Flatbush, Brooklyn, is Torah Editor of The Jewish Press. He can be contacted at yklass@jewishpress.com.


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Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

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Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

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Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

Name Withheld

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