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Parshas Ha’azinu


Weekly Luach - Shabbat Shalom

Vol. LXIII No. 39                                 5773

 

New York City
CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
September 28, 2012 – 12 Tishrei 5773
6:22 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sabbath Ends: 7:26 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Weekly Reading: Ha’azinu
Weekly Haftara: VaYedabber David (II Samuel 22:1-51)

Daf Yomi: Berachos 58
Mishna Yomit: Nedarim 8:7-9:1
Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 128:25-27
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Tum’as Tzara’as, chap. 8-10
Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin: 5:55 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 9:48 a.m. NYC E.D.T.

 Shabbos: All tefillos as customary, except we do not say Av HaRachamim nor do we make Ke-l Moleh Rachamim, nor Tzidkos’cha, and at Maariv, Motza’ei Shabbos we do not say Vi’yehi Noam v’Atah Kadosh.

Sunday, erev Sukkos: Aside from our erev Yom Tov preparations, we have to make sure that the sukka we will use is finished and ready to accommodate us for fulfilling the mitzva of eating and sleeping in the sukka. This is also the last opportunity to acquire the Four Species: esrog, lulav, hadassim and aravos. These should preferably be of exceptional quality – mehuddarim – but have to satisfy, at the very least, the minimum requirements qualifying them as kosher to fulfill the mitzva (see Orach Chayyim 645‑650, Hilchot Lulav).

We light candles at 6:21 p.m., N.Y.C. E.D.T. that is, 20 minutes before shekiah (sunset), and recite Lehadlik ner shel Yom Tov as well as Shehecheyanu. Mincha: Usual weekday tefilla. Maariv: Usual service for Yom Tov, as found in the Machzor. The Shemoneh Esreh is that of Shalosh Regalim. At the conclusion of the Shemoneh Esreh the chazzan says Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, LeDavid Hashem Ori (Sefarad have said LeDavid Hashem Ori following Mincha) and their respective Mourner’s Kaddish recitals.

In congregations where it is the custom to recite Kiddush in the synagogue after Maariv, Kiddush can only be publicly recited in synagogues where a sukka is available.

Eating in the sukka: Upon returning home we do not tarry but go straight to the sukka (lest it rain later on). We recite the appropriate Ushpizin (lit. invitation of guests) to welcome to our sukka the seven faithful shepherds of the people of Israel – Avraham, Yitzhak, Yaakov, Yosef, Moshe, Aharon and David Hamelech. On each of the seven days one of them is the guest of honor leading the others, starting with our Patriarch Avraham on the first night. We then recite the Kiddush of Yom Tov. We say four berachos: Borei pri hagafen, Mekaddesh Yisrael ve’hazemanim, Leishev basukka, and Shehecheyanu.

On the first night one is duty‑bound to eat in the sukka even if it involves tza’ar (pain). This does not apply on the other nights and days, when one who is extremely uncomfortable (due to rain, or extreme cold, etc.) is relieved of this obligation (see Orach Chayyim 640:4 and Rema ad loc., who qualifies this halacha; see also 639:2, Rema, regarding sleeping in the sukka).

If it rains on the first evening (and the rain is such that it is not likely to stop), we make Kiddush in the sukka, we wash (for bread) and eat a kezayit (olive‑size) piece of challah in the sukka, and then return to the house to eat the rest of the meal. (Commenting on a discussion regarding how long one is required to wait for the rain to stop, the Mishna Berura (O.C. 639:5) notes that it is proper to wait no longer than until midnight.)

In Birkas Hamazon we say Ya’aleh VeYavo and HaRachaman hu yakim lanu es sukkas David hanofales during the seven days of Sukkos. Each meal (or snack) requires the blessing of Leishev basukka as well as the appropriate berachos for the various foods.

Shacharis, Monday morning: Pesukei DeZimra, and chazzan chants from HaKeil. Kerias Shema follows the weekday pattern, then the silent Shemoneh Esreh of Shalosh Regalim, followed by the chazzan’s repetition.

Lulav and Esrog: We take the lulav (to which 3 hadassim are bound on the right side and 2 aravos on the left side – see Mishna Berura, Orach Chayyim 651:1) in our right hand and the esrog (upside down, the pitom facing downside) in our left hand and recite the berachaAl netilas lulav …” in a manner oveir le’asiyasan, that is, before we have physically accomplished the taking of the lulav and esrog. We next recite Shehecheyanu with the esrog in an upright position (the pitom facing upward) and wave the lulav in six directions.

We recite Hallel while holding the lulav and esrog, waving at Hodu and Ana Hashem (see chart). At the conclusion of Hallel some congregations (Nusach Sefarad and some Ashkenaz) say Hoshanos while circling the Bimah(Lema’an Amitach, as found in the Machzor). We put away the lulav and esrog and the chazzan recites Kaddish Tiskabbel.

We remove two Torah scrolls from the Ark. In the first we read from Parashas Emor (Vayikra 22:26‑23:44) and call up five aliyos. In the second scroll the Maftir reads from Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 29:12‑16). The Haftara is Hineh yom ba (Zechariah 14:1‑21).

After the Birkos HaHaftara the chazzan chants Kah Keili, followed by Ashrei and Yehallelu, and we return the Torah scrolls to the Ark. The chazzan recites half‑Kaddish.

Mussaf: All say the silent Shemoneh Esreh of Shalosh Regalim. The Kohanim go up to duchan during the chazzan’s repetition, and this time we do say Ribbono shel Olam and Yehi Ratzon. (Most Nusach Ashkenaz congregations say Hoshanos at this point – see Shacharis). The chazzan recites Kaddish Tiskabbel and we conclude the service with Ein Ke’Elokenu, Aleinu (Nusach Ashkenaz now add Shir Shel YomHayom Yom Shelishi – and LeDavid Hashem Ori) and their respective Kaddish recitals. Some congregations conclude with An’im Zemiros and Mourner’s Kaddish.

Sukka: The text for the daytime Kiddush is: Eleh Mo’adei , VaYedabber Moshe, followed by the blessings of Borei pri hagafen (on wine) and Leishev basukka.

Mincha: Ashrei, U’va LeTziyyon, the chazzan recites half‑Kaddish, and all say the silent Shemoneh Esreh of Shalosh Regalim. Following the repetition, the chazzan recites Kaddish Tiskabbel and we conclude with Aleinu and Mourner’s Kaddish.

Monday evening, the second night of Yom Tov: since we are not allowed to make any preparations from one day of Yom Tov to the other, we wait 45 minutes after Shekia (N.Y.C. E.D.T. time 7:23 p.m.) some wait 60 minutes  (N.Y.C. time: 7:38 p.m. E.D.T.) while others wait 72 minutes (N.Y.C. time: 7:50 p.m. E.D.T.) before we light candles and then we commence all preparations. When lighting candles we recite Lehadlik Ner Shel Yom Tov, and Shehecheyanu.

Maariv (the second evening of Sukkos): Usual tefilla of Yom Tov as found in the Machzor, followed by Kaddish Tiskabbel by the chazzan. We conclude with Aleinu, LeDavid Hashem Ori and their respective Mourner’s Kaddish recitals.

Sukka: We recite the Ushpizin (our Patriarch Yitzhak leads the honored guests on the second night). Kiddush of Yom Tov, concluding with the blessing of  Shehecheyanu and Leishev basukka  .

Shacharis, Tuesday morning: see first day.

Lulav & Esrog: see first day.

Hallel: see first day.

(Hoshanos: some congregations say it following HallelEven Shesiya; also see first day).

Kerias HaTorah: We open the Ark and follow the usual text, including the Shelosh Esreh Middos and Ribbono shel Olam. We remove two Torah scrolls from the Ark and read from Parashas Emor (Vayikra 22:26-23:44) in the first scroll, and call 5 aliyos. We then place the second scroll next to the first one on the Bimah (desk) and the Reader recites half‑Kaddish. The Maftir reads from the second scroll in Parashas Pinchas (Bamidbar 29:12‑16). The Haftara is VaYikahalu el hamelech Shlomo (I Kings 8:2‑21).

After the Birkos HaHaftara the chazzan chants Kah Keili, followed by Ashrei and Yehallelu, and we return the Torah scrolls to the Ark. The chazzan recites half‑Kaddish.

Mussaf: See first day

Hoshanos: (Even Shesiya) See first day.

Sukka: The text for the daytime Kiddush is Eleh Mo’adei, VaYedabber Moshe, followed by the blessings of Borei pri hagafen (on wine) and Leishev basukka.

Mincha: See first day.

 

   Ma’ariv: The earliest zeman is 45 minutes after sunset, that is, 7:21 p.m. (N.Y.C., E.D.T.) , Maariv prayer is usual weekday Maariv with Ata chonantanu. Havdala is over wine, no flame or spices

The Maariv prayer (for the first day of Chol Hamo’ed) is the usual weekday tefilla, with the addition of Ata chonanta and Ya’aleh VeYavo with the mention of Sukkos.

Havdala: Havdala is recited in the sukka. We do not say the blessings for light and spices, but say Borei pri hagafen and Hamavdil bein kodesh lechol, concluding with Leishev basukka. In the Ushpizin prayer our Patriarch Yaakov leads the honored guests.

Shacharis: Chol Hamo’ed: There are numerous customs regarding the donning of tefillin on Chol Hamoed. Generally, Nusach Sefarad and followers of the Vilna Gaon do not don tefillin – but others – Nusach Ashkenaz – do, some without a beracha, some with the utterance of an inaudible beracha; each should follow his family custom. Nevertheless, all (including the chazzan) remove their tefillin before Hallel.

Shemoneh Esreh: weekday text with Ya’aleh VeYavo.

Hallel: We take the lulav and esrog in hand (lulav, bound with 3 hadassim on the right side and 2 aravos on the left side), the lulav in the right hand and the esrog in the left hand, pitom facing downward (see first day). (Sefarad and certain other congregations follow now with Hoshanos, circling the Bimahonce – E’eroch Shui – on the first day of Chol Hamo’ed; Kel Lemoshaos on the second; Om Netzura on Shabbos, the third day; and Adon Hamoshia on the fourth day.)

We then remove one Sefer Torah from the Ark and call 4 aliyos. We read in Parashas Pinchas, First day (Bamidbar 29:17‑25) U’vayom Hasheni – Kohen; U’vayom Hashelishi – Levi, U’vayom Harevi’i – Yisrael; U’vayom Hasheni/U’vayom Hashelishi 2nd Yisrael. Second day Chol Hamo’ed: (Bamidbar 29:20‑28) U’vayom Hashelishi – Kohen;Uvayom Harevi’I – Levi; U’vayom Hachamishi – Yisrael; U’vayom Hashelishi/U’vayom Harevi’i – (2nd) Yisrael. Third day Chol Hamo’ed Shabbos – see next week’s Luach below; Fourth day Chol Hamo’ed: (Bamidbar 29:26‑34) U’vayom HachamishiKohen; U’vayom Hashishi – Levi; U’vayom Hashevi’i– Yisrael; U’vayom Hachamishi/U’vayom Hashishi – (2nd) Yisrael.

Mussaf, Chol Hamo’ed: Shemoneh Esreh of Yom Tov with mention of the Korbenos Hayom – the special additional sacrifices: 1st day, U’vayom Hasheni, U’vayom Hashelishi (U’minchasam); 2nd day, U’vayom Hashelishi, U’vayom Harevi’i (U’minchasam); 3rd day, Shabbos, see next week’s Luach below; 4th day U’vayom Hachamishi, U’vayom Hashishi (U’minchasam).

Hoshanos: See Shacharis.

Mincha, Chol Hamo’ed: Weekday Shemoneh Esreh with Ya’aleh VeYavo.

The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by many congregations and Yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapter 83, 130, 142–Y.K.

About the Author: Rabbi Yaakov Klass, rav of Congregation K’hal Bnei Matisyahu in Flatbush, Brooklyn, is Torah Editor of The Jewish Press. He can be contacted at yklass@jewishpress.com.


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