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October 31, 2014 / 7 Heshvan, 5775
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Parshas Tzav

Weekly Luach - Shabbat Shalom

Vol. LXV No. 11                                 5774
New York City
CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
March 14, 2014 – 12 Adar II, 5774
6:41 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

 

Sabbath Ends: 7:44 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sabbath Ends: Rabbenu Tam 8:15 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Weekly Reading: Tzav
Weekly Haftara: Koh Amar Hashem (I Samuel 15:2-34 for Ashkenazim; 15:1-34 for Sepharadim)
Daf Yomi: Sukka 39
Mishna Yomit: Menachos 1:1-2
Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 345:2-4
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos Kiddush ha’Chodesh chap. 12-14
Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin: 6:19 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sunrise: 7:09 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 10:07 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sunset: 7:01 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

This Shabbos is Parashas Zachor. At Shacharis some recite Yotzros in the Reader’s Repetition. We take out two Torah scrolls from the Ark. In the first we read the weekly Parasha of Tzav and call up seven Aliyos. For Maftir we read from the second scroll in Parashas Ki Tetzei (Devarim 25:17-19), from “Zachor” until the end of the Parasha. This Keriah is DeOraisa. We do not say Hazkaras Neshamos and Av HaRachamim and we do not say Tzidkas’cha at Mincha.

Motza’ei Shabbos – Saturday evening is Purim – Usual Maariv prayer, Ata Chonantanu. In the Shemoneh Esreh, Al Hanissim is added after Modim, before Ve’al Kulam. (We also add Al Hanissim in Birkas Hamazon on Purim). Following the Shemoneh Esreh, the chazzan says Kaddish Shalem with Tiskabbel. We then take the Scroll of Esther which we brought to Shul before Shabbos. The Ba’al Keriah spreads out his Megillah completely, folding it over and over, and he recites the three blessings: Al Mikra Megillah, She’asa Nissim, and Shehecheyanu. At the conclusion of the reading the Ba’al Keriah says “Harav es rivenu,” the congregation then says Asher Heini and Shoshanas Yaakov, Vi’yehi Noam v’Ata Kadosh, followed by Kaddish Shalem (no Tiskabbel) and Aleinu.

Purim, Sunday morning, Shacharis – As at night, we add Al Hanissim in the Shemoneh Esreh. In the repetition some say Krovetz le’Purim, no Tachanum, half- Kaddish. We take out a Torah scroll from the Ark and we call up three aliyos. We read from “Vayavo Amalek” in Parashas BeShalach until the end of the Parasha, followed by half-Kaddish. After returning the Torah scroll to the Ark we again take out the Megillah and the Ba’al Keriah recites the same three blessings he said at Maariv. It is also customary to announce that all should have in mind, during the recitation of Shehecheyanu, the other mitzvos of Purim – mishlo’ach manos and Se’udas Purim. (See Mishna Berura, Orach Chayyim 692:1.) We read the Megillah (we do not remove the tefillin until we conclude the entire Tefilla). At the conclusion of the reading, the Ba’al Keriah says “Harav es rivenu” and the congregation then says Shoshanas Yaakov. We send mishlo’ach manos – two portions to at least one person (preferably readily edible foods). We give matanos la’evyonim – a minimum of one gift to each of two poor people, but one who gives more is praised. At Mincha we also add Al Hanissim. The Se’udas Purim must start while it is still day. We set a festive table with fish, meat and wine. Even if the Se’uda concludes at night, we say Al Hanissim in Birkas Hamazon. Monday is Shushan Purim, no Tachanun, no Kel erech apayim, no yehi ratzon nor Lamenatze’ach.

                        The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by many congregations and Yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz 

About the Author: Rabbi Yaakov Klass, rav of Congregation K’hal Bnei Matisyahu in Flatbush, Brooklyn, is Torah Editor of The Jewish Press. He can be contacted at yklass@jewishpress.com.


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Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

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Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

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Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

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