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October 20, 2014 / 26 Tishri, 5775
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Parshas Vayelech


Weekly Luach - Shabbat Shalom

During the chazzan’s repetition we recite the 13 Middos numerous times, repeat the abbreviated confessional, and upon concluding we all say Avinu Malkenu.

The chazzan, and the congregation after him, says “Shema Yisrael” aloud. This is followed by “Baruch Shem Kevod Malchuso” aloud three times (by the chazzan and then the congregation) and finally “Hashem Hu HaElokim” aloud seven times by the chazzan and then the congregation.

The chazzan recites Kaddish Tiskabbel until “De’amiran be’alma Ve’imru Amen,” and the shofar is blown. Kaddish is then concluded.

Weekday Maariv: We add Ata Chonantanu. At the conclusion of Maariv, Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu then Kaddish Yasom, LeDavid Hashem Ori, and Kaddish Yasom.

If the sky is clear, we recite Kiddush Levana.

Following Havdala at home and breaking our fast (fast ends in N.Y.C. at 7:26 E.D.T.), we start with the construction of the sukka.

Since Tachanun would not be said on most of the days of this month, we do not resume saying Tachanun until the 2nd day of Cheshvan.

The following chapters of Tehillim are being recited by many congregations and Yeshivos for our brothers and sisters in Eretz Yisrael: Chapter 83, 130, 142. –Y.K.

About the Author: Rabbi Yaakov Klass, rav of Congregation K’hal Bnei Matisyahu in Flatbush, Brooklyn, is Torah Editor of The Jewish Press. He can be contacted at yklass@jewishpress.com.


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Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

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Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

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Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

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