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Yom Kippur


Weekly Luach - Shabbat Shalom

Vol. LXIV No. 37                                5774
New York City
CANDLE LIGHTING TIME
September 13, 2013 – 9 Tishrei 5774
6:48 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

Sabbath Ends: 7:52 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sabbath Ends: Rabbenu Tam 8:19 p.m. NYC E.D.T.
Weekly Reading: Yom Kippur (see below)
Weekly Haftara: Yom Kippur (see below)
Daf Yomi: Pesachim 85
Mishna Yomit: Shevuos 7:2-3
Halacha Yomit: Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 302:7-9
Rambam Yomi: Hilchos She’ar Avos haTum’ah chap. 3-5
Earliest time for Tallis and Tefillin: 5:45 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sunrise: 6:34 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Latest Kerias Shema: 9:43 a.m. NYC E.D.T.
Sunset: 7:07 p.m. NYC E.D.T.

The Fast of Yom Kippur falls on Shabbos.

Friday morning – Shacharis (Erev Yom Kippur): We recite the Selichos for Erev Yom Kippur, which consist of the shortest Selichos text of the year. We do not say Mizmor l’Soda nor Tachanun but we do say Avinu Malkeinu. After chatzos hayom (midday, 12:51 p.m. NYC E.D.T.) we immerse in the mikveh to ritually purify ourselves.

It is customary to partake of [a] festive meal[s] on Erev Yom Kippur since it is a positive precept to feast on that day (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chayyim 604:1; see also the Taz ad loc. – quoting Berachos 8b – that one should reduce his Torah learning on that day so that he may fast well on Yom Kippur, and that “one who feasts and drinks on the 9th [of Tishrei] is considered as if he fasted on both the 9th and the 10th of Tishrei.”

Mincha is the usual weekday tefilla: Ashrei, half-Kaddish and the Shemoneh Esreh; before “Elokai, netzor leshoni me’ra” we insert the Viddui (confessional) whose text is found in the Machzor.

We are careful to complete the Seuda Mafsekes (the final meal before the fast) while it is still day in order to add from the mundane to the holy, le’hosif mechol al hakodesh (i.e., from the 9th day to the 10th day).

It is customary to light yahrzeit candles for the departed souls [of relatives] since we say Yizkor on Yom Kippur.

The beracha for lighting the candles (6:48 p.m. NYC E.D.T.) is “Le’hadlik ner shel Shabbos veshel Yom HaKippurim,” followed by Shehecheyanu.

Kol Nidrei: We arrive at the synagogue early and don both kittel and tallis. (If one dons the tallis before sunset, he recites the blessing “le’his’atef batzitzis.”)

We remove the Torah scroll from the Ark and the Chazzan, flanked by two of the congregation’s leaders, intones the Kol Nidrei prayer. The Chazzan recites the Shehecheyanu, which the congregation says with him in an undertone (except for those who recited the Shehecheyanu at home when lighting the candles).

Kabbalas Shabbos: we say Mizmor Shir LeYom HaShabbos, Hashem Malach, followed by Mourner’s Kaddish (Nusach Sefarad start with Mizmor LeDavid, and recite the first two stanzas and last two stanzas of Lechah Dodi, and then continue like Nusach Ashkenaz above.)

Maariv: We follow the text of the Machzor. At Kerias Shema we say “Baruch Shem Kevod Malchuso” aloud (on this day we are likened to the angels who praise Hashem with these words), concluding with VeShamru and Ki Bayom Hazeh. Then the Chazzan says half-Kaddish and we recite the Shemoneh Esreh. We are careful to include all Shabbos references in the Shemoneh Esreh. Before “Elokai, netzor leshoni me’ra” we add the Viddui.

Following the Shemoneh Esreh, Vayechulu, Magen Avos,  the Chazzan and congregation chant various Piyyutim and recite the Viddui. We conclude with Kaddish Tiskabbel, Aleinu, LeDavid Hashem Ori and their respective Kaddish recitations (Nusach Sefarad say LeDavid Mizmor following the Shemoneh Esreh and then continue with Piyyutim as above.)

When we wake up in the morning we perform Netilas Yadayim by washing our fingers up to the knuckles only.

Shacharis: We don the kittel and the tallis and say the scheduled tefillos and Korbanos, followed by Kaddish DeRabbanan. We recite Pesukei DeZimra and Nishmas slowly and with concentration. The Chazzan who serves as the Ba’al Shacharis starts with “HaMelech” and continues through Yishtabach (most congregations add Shir Hama’alos) and half-Kaddish. In birkas Kerias Shema we substitute HaMeir with Hakol Yoducha, Kel Adon and LaKel Asher Shavas, since it is also Shabbos. At Kerias Shema, Baruch Shem Kevod Malchuso is again said aloud, like last night. The Shacharis Shemoneh Esreh follows with all Shabbos references included, with the Viddui before “Elokai, netzor leshoni me’ra.”

About the Author: Rabbi Yaakov Klass, rav of Congregation K’hal Bnei Matisyahu in Flatbush, Brooklyn, is Torah Editor of The Jewish Press. He can be contacted at yklass@jewishpress.com.


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Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

Name Withheld

Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

Name Withheld

Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

Name Withheld

Question: I recently loaned money to a friend who has been able to repay only part of it. This was an interest-free loan. We exchanged a signed IOU, not a proper shtar with witnesses, since I have always trusted her integrity and only wanted a document that confirms what was loaned and what was repaid. Now that shemittah is approaching, what should I do? Should I forgive the loan? And if my friend is not able to repay it, may I deduct the unpaid money from my ma’aser requirement?

Name Withheld

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