web analytics
March 5, 2015 / 14 Adar , 5775
At a Glance
Kidz
Sponsored Post


A Time To Throw Away

Tales of the Gaonim-logo

The great Shlomo HaMelech, wisest of all men, wrote that there is a time for all things. There is a time to be born and a time to die, a time to cry and a time to laugh, a time to preserve and a time to throw away.

When one thinks of these words he soon realizes the wisdom that lies in them. Everything in this world had its place – even seemingly foolish things. Here is a story that clearly brings out this lesson.

 

Eliphelet

In the city of Bais Lechem there once lived a very wealthy man by the name of Eliphelet. He had amassed a great fortune through his wisdom and business knowledge. He was also blessed with an only son whom he loved very much.  The lad, whose name was Yigal, was a good son who loved G-d devotedly and who spent his days in the study of Torah. He was devoted to his parents, respecting them in every way and was generous and kind to all who were in need.

As the years passed, Yigal grew into a handsome, wise and fine young man. One day, he approached his father and said: “It is time that I began to learn something about your business. Allow me to go with you on your next trip across the seas. There I can see the wondrous lands where you buy and sell, and I, too, can learn to be great merchant.”

“What you say is right, Yigal,” replied his father. “It is indeed time that you began to learn. On my next trip you shall come with me.”

 

An Ocean Voyage

Yigal could barely contain his excitement and impatience as he waited for the great day to arrive. Together with his father, Yigal went to the dock to board a ship that would take them across the seas to wonderful and strange lands and peoples.

Yigal stood on deck, his eyes shining with excitement as he looked out at the gently rolling waves and dreamed of the adventures that awaited him. His father, however, had his mind on other, more serious things.

He had noticed the captain and the crew eyeing him and Eliphelet felt a sense of foreboding crept over him. Stealing away as evening fell, he crept into the hold of the ship and silently listened as two crewmen spoke to each other:

“The captain insists that the older Jew is a man of great wealth. He says that his pockets are lined with money and that he would be an easy prey.”

“What does he plan to do?” asked the other.

“Tomorrow afternoon we will pounce upon the two Jews and kill them. We will then divide their money and no one will ever be the wiser for their bodies will never be found.”

 

A Plan

When Eliphelet heard this, he trembled and prayed to G-d: “Father in Heaven, be with me in my time of terrible danger.”

Leaving his hiding place he sought out Yigal, who was calmly resting and learning. Coming close, Eliphelet saw that his son was learning Koheles and was reading the verse that says: “There is a time to preserve and a time to throw away.”

Suddenly a thought entered his mind. Of course, that was the way. It could yet save their lives. Approaching his son, Eliphelet whispered: “Listen, my son, we are in great danger.”

“What do you mean, Father? What has happened?” Yigal asked anxiously.

“Do not raise your voice,” Eliphelet cautioned. “If they hear us, we are doomed. I have just learned that the captain and sailors intend to kill us and take our money.”

“Woe unto us,” cried Yigal. “What can we do?”

“There may be an answer, and it is a thing that I thought of as I read the verse in Koheles. We must pretend that we are quarreling over the money. I will then begin to grapple with you, seize the bag of gold that we have and throw it in the sea. Perhaps then the captain will see that we are poor and that it is pointless for him to kill us.”

 

The Plan Succeeds

“Very well,” replied Yigal. “We have little choice but to follow your plan. May the Almighty be with us in this time of our great danger.”

As morning came, Eliphelet and Yigal put their plan into action. They began to shout and quarrel violently and the captain and sailors hurried to the deck to see what the commotion was about. When Eliphelet saw that the entire crew had assembled to watch he called out:

“Very well, if that is how you want it, the money will belong to neither you nor to me. It shall belong to no one!”

And as he said these words, he seized the bag of gold and as the startled crew looked on, he flung it overboard into the sea. As the chagrined captain beheld this he hastily called together his crew for a meeting.

“The mad Jew has thrown away the gold. There is no longer any reason for us to kill him.”

 

The Ship Docks

Within a few days, the ship landed at one of their usual stops. Eliphelet hurried away and rushed to court. There he told the judges all that had transpired. Police were hurriedly sent to the dock and all the crewmen were rushed to the courtroom.

After a brief investigation, the judges reached a decision. Calling upon the captain to stand before them, one said:

“It is obvious that you planned to kill this man and his son. Had he not cleverly outwitted you, you would have the blood of two people on your conscience. In reality you are deserving of death for your foul plan but we will give you one chance to save your worthless neck.

“If you repay this Jew the amount of gold that he was forced to throw away, we will allow you to live. If not, you will hang by your heels from the highest tree.”

The terrified captain was only too glad to comply with the judges’ demands and he quickly paid Eliphelet every penny he had lost.

Afterwards, the judges asked Eliphelet: “Where did you learn such wisdom as you exhibited during your ordeal?”

“I am a Jew,” replied Eliphelet, “and the words of our sages and wise men are my eyes in everything I do. In this most critical time of my life, I followed their advice too. The great King Solomon wrote: ‘There is a time to throw away.’ I did exactly what he said and it saved my life.”

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “A Time To Throw Away”

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
An Arab sheikh hands out flowers in a gesture of brotherhood and good will.
Haifa U Research Confirms, ‘Think Good & It Will Be Good!’
Latest Kidz Stories
Gaonim-Midrash-logo-NEW

“I wanted you to have a taste of the cold,” answered Rav Chaim. “This way, you too can feel the intense cold and realize the suffering of this man and his wife, who are now residing in a bitterly cold house.”

Gaonim-Midrash-logo-NEW

“Don’t worry,” said the king, “what could it be worth, two or three talents of gold? I’ll give you ten talents of gold, so you can forget about it.”

Gaonim-Midrash-logo-NEW

Shmuel HaKatan shook his head and said: “No, what happened here today is a sign not of great love. On the contrary, it is a bad omen.”

Gaonim-Midrash-logo-NEW

The arguments, however, could never appease his wife and one Thursday she came to him for money to purchase food for Shabbos.

He walked out of the room, making sure to leave the door ajar so that the two litigants could hear his voice.

Don’t you know Avraham, the famous dry goods merchant, who lives near the lake in a big mansion?

“What could I do? Your wife is hard of hearing,” whispered the poor woman barely able to talk.

“I would appreciate if you could give me some pointers on how to improve my wine,” said the wine merchant eagerly.

“And what was your grandfather’s name?” asked the visitor. “The same as my name,” replied the child.

The trial was the next day and he hadn’t as yet told the family what he would do.

It’s a special one. Some sort of family heirloom.

The man was overjoyed to see his benefactor and gave them food and water besides shelter and safety.

Because of this I wandered about and found friends in similar situations who were also unhappy and I began to hang out with them.

Time passed and Zemira gave birth to a son but not even this could awaken Avinadav from his melancholy.

Yonadav was greatly impressed at the vast sums of money the young man had in his possessions.

“I do nothing worthwhile,” he modestly replied and refused to discuss any of his deeds. For the man was a very modest and humble person.

More Articles from Rabbi Sholom Klass
Gaonim-Midrash-logo-NEW

“I wanted you to have a taste of the cold,” answered Rav Chaim. “This way, you too can feel the intense cold and realize the suffering of this man and his wife, who are now residing in a bitterly cold house.”

Gaonim-Midrash-logo-NEW

“Don’t worry,” said the king, “what could it be worth, two or three talents of gold? I’ll give you ten talents of gold, so you can forget about it.”

Shmuel HaKatan shook his head and said: “No, what happened here today is a sign not of great love. On the contrary, it is a bad omen.”

The arguments, however, could never appease his wife and one Thursday she came to him for money to purchase food for Shabbos.

He walked out of the room, making sure to leave the door ajar so that the two litigants could hear his voice.

Don’t you know Avraham, the famous dry goods merchant, who lives near the lake in a big mansion?

“What could I do? Your wife is hard of hearing,” whispered the poor woman barely able to talk.

“I would appreciate if you could give me some pointers on how to improve my wine,” said the wine merchant eagerly.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/kidz/midrash-stories/a-time-to-throw-away/2013/11/22/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: