web analytics
August 30, 2014 / 4 Elul, 5774
At a Glance
Kidz
Sponsored Post
Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat (L) visits the JewishPress.com booth at The Event. And the Winners of the JewishPress.com Raffle Are…

Congratulations to all the winners of the JewishPress.com raffle at The Event



Shmuel Hakatan


Tales-of-The-Midrash-logo

In the days of Shmuel Hakatan a terrible drought held the land in its deadly grip. The wheat withered in the field and the grass dried and died. Day after day, the skies remained leaden and no clouds appeared to bring rain and salvation to the parched land.

The people knew that Shmuel Hakatan was a saintly and righteous man and they hoped that in his merit the Almighty might bring rain to them.

Coming to Shmuel Hakatan, they said: “The people of Israel are in great distress. Pray to the Almighty that He send us rain. Perhaps He will hearken to your prayers.”

The Rains Come

Shmuel Hakatan then answered the people saying: “Proclaim a fast for the morrow and call unto G-d with all your might and He will have mercy upon you.”

The leaders of the community immediately issued a call throughout the area for a fast and prayers to begin the next day. No sooner had the sun risen, then a great shower of rain began to fall on the land, soaking all the fields and fill­ing all the wells with precious water.

The people were overjoyed and they called out in great happiness: “Today we have seen that we are good in the eyes of the Almighty for He answered us rapidly, even before we called out to him.”

But Shmuel Hakatan shook his head and said: “No, what happened here today is a sign not of great love. On the contrary, it is a bad omen.”

The people looked at the great sage in puz­zlement.

“Why do you say that Behold, G-d sent us rain before our prayers were even ut­tered. Is this not a good sign?”

“No. It is similar to the case of a servant who seeks a favor from the king. The king knows of this and quickly tells his other ser­vants: ‘Hurry and give him what he wants, for I do not wish to be bothered with him.’”

Another Drought

Some time later, still another drought struck the land. Once again the fields dried up and the people were in great distress. Shmuel Hakatan called for yet another fast and more prayers.

This time, the people continued fasting and praying the entire day.

“Please G-d, Have mercy upon us! Redeem us, Grant us salvation and do not turn us away empty-handed.”

All day they prayed; all day they fasted. It was to no avail. The skies remained as before, the rain locked in and the land still thirsty. The people returned to their homes that night, sad and forlorn. Only then did the skies open up and the rains came down on the earth bringing life and hope.

“This, too, is not a good omen,” said Shmuel Hakatan. “To what may this situation be compared? To a king, whose servant re­quests a favor and the monarch tells his ad­visors: ‘wait until he suffers a little more before giving it to him.’”

The Good Omen

The people then asked Shmuel Hakatan: “If this is so, how can we know when the people are acceptable in the eyes of the Almighty?”

And Shmuel Hakatan answered: “This is how you shall know. When the peo­ple are in need of rain and they come to the synagogues and say, ‘Who makes the wind to blow and the rain to come down,’ if then, the Almighty grants them what they ask, this is the sign that they have found favor in His eyes and at that time you may rejoice.”

In The Days To Come

And the spirit of G-d rested on the great Shmuel Hakatan and he was permitted to see the events that would occur in the future for Israel. He saw the terrible tragedies and terror that would befall his people and his heart grew heavy within him. He would not eat or sleep and he walked about the entire day as a mourner, with his head bowed and bent. He grew ill and was forced to lie in bed but his situation grew worse and he lay at death’s door!

The sages, hearing the sad news, hurried over to see how he was. They found him only a shell of the man that he had been, pale and emaciated, unable to speak above a whisper.

When he saw that they had come he began to move his lips feebly. The rabbis hurried over to make out what he was saying.

“Woe unto us,” he whispered with a terrible sigh. “The great Rabi Shimon and Yishmael will be killed by the sword, their fellow sages will be led forth to slaughter, the people will be plundered by the enemy and terrible evils and events are preparing to come the land.”

The sages heard these ter­rible words and they fell back in fear. At that moment the soul of Shmuel Hakatan, the giant of Torah and the humble, modest sage, returned to its Maker.

And Rabban Gamliel commanded that Shmuel Hakatan’s notebook and his key be placed in his coffin, and the sages mourned him saying:

“If a king shall die – his son shall inherit his crown. If a wealthy man shall pass on, his sons will take over his wealth. But with Shmuel Hakatan dying childless, wisdom has died with him.”

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Shmuel Hakatan”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
ISIS in Quneitra
Updates from Kuneitra, Syria [video]
Latest Kidz Stories
Tales of the Gaonim-logo

“It isn’t the work,” said Eliezer. “I want to learn our holy Torah.”

Tales of the Gaonim-logo

In their perverted justice they also declared the following law: Anyone who was injured by another so that blood flowed from his wound, was compelled to pay his attacker since he bled him!

Tales-of-The-Midrash-logo

“When I asked why she cried so much she said she came from a very religious home and feared she would be sold to a non-Jew and forced to convert.

Tales of the Gaonim-logo

Know that from. the day I began to recite the holy name of God, I have always loved Shabbos

And so the enemy burst into the Sanctuary and set up a stand on the Temple Mount.

By means of a clever pretext, they succeeded in getting Rabi Yitzhak aboard a ship and sailed it down the river.

When the young man awoke, he did not know where he was. As he looked around, the princess looked out and saw him.

One winter morning a terrible blizzard raged, the weather dropped to below zero, and the woman became desperately ill.

Entering the city he visited the cattle market and saw two parei adumah untouched by any harness.

Crowded into their ghettos and suffering legal disabilities that make today’s claims of discriminations pale into insignificance, the German Jews suffered poverty and wretchedness.

Every night he would go out in the darkness and dig for hours until the waters began to rise, and watering places for the weary and thirsty came into being.

One of the greatest opponents was a certain wealthy man who did all that he could to make life difficult for Rav Naftali.

Do you wonder at times what possible purpose some little insect might have for being?

The two fathers began to discuss the terms and naturally, they were astounded to find that each one assumed that the other would give double.

Twelve years went by until Eliyahu HaNavi came to the entrance of the cave and exclaimed, “The Roman emperor has died and all of his decrees have become void. You are no longer under a death sentence.”

Rav Naftali was born the day that the Baal Shem Tov passed away, on the holiday of Shavuos, in the year 5520

More Articles from Rabbi Sholom Klass
Tales of the Gaonim-logo

“It isn’t the work,” said Eliezer. “I want to learn our holy Torah.”

Tales-of-The-Midrash-logo

He followed her advice and, before departing, the rabbanim offered him a bracha. “Aba Yudin, may the Lord return your wealth, for all the kind deeds you do.”

In their perverted justice they also declared the following law: Anyone who was injured by another so that blood flowed from his wound, was compelled to pay his attacker since he bled him!

“When I asked why she cried so much she said she came from a very religious home and feared she would be sold to a non-Jew and forced to convert.

Know that from. the day I began to recite the holy name of God, I have always loved Shabbos

And so the enemy burst into the Sanctuary and set up a stand on the Temple Mount.

By means of a clever pretext, they succeeded in getting Rabi Yitzhak aboard a ship and sailed it down the river.

When the young man awoke, he did not know where he was. As he looked around, the princess looked out and saw him.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/kidz/midrash-stories/shmuel-hakatan/2012/08/03/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: