web analytics
April 25, 2014 / 25 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance
Kidz
Sponsored Post
Spa 1.2 Combining Modern Living in Traditional Jerusalem

A unique and prestigious residential project in now being built in Mekor Haim Street in Jerusalem.



The Earthquake (Part II)


Tales-of-The-Midrash-logo

Share Button

No matter what Zemira said and how much she implored Avinadav to tell her what was bothering him, he remained adamant in his silence.

If anything, his depression and sadness seemed to grow with every passing day. He began to fast three times a week and he gave generously of his money to every poor man who passed by. He would go about ransoming slaves from their masters, and spend all day in prayer and meditation.

Yonadav, his father-in-law, who saw all this, told his daughter: “Be comforted my daughter, for the Almighty has given you a husband whose charity and goodness are unbelievably great.”

The Soldiers

Thus, time passed and Zemira gave birth to a son, but not even this could awaken Avinadav from his melancholy sadness. Then, one night, as the entire family sat eating their bread, one of the servants burst into the room and cried out: “A band of armed soldiers has suddenly appeared and they have surrounded the master’s house!”

The family members leaped to their feet in amazement, but even as they did the door burst open and the captain of the soldiers with ten armed men stormed into the room.

A Terrible Blow

“What is the meaning of this?” demanded Yonadav.

I have been ordered by the king to seize your son-in-law, dead or alive, for he is a condemned man.”

“Are you out of your mind?” exclaimed Yonadav. “My son-in-law is known as the kindest and most charitable of men.”

To his amazement, however, no sooner had he finished speaking when Avinadav stepped quietly forward and said to the captain of the guards: “I am indeed the man for whom you have been searching.” And he thrust forward his arms to have the chains tied about them.

The shock was too much for Zemira she fainted.

“Allow me, I beg you, before I am taken away to at least kiss my son for the last time,” begged Avinadav.

“Go kiss your son,” replied the captain, “I too am a father and I understand how you feel.”

With tears streaming down his face, Avinadav kissed the infant son he was destined never to see again, and all who saw the heartbreaking scene could not restrain themselves and wept bitterly.

The soldiers took Avinadav to the waiting wagon and on to the capital city of Jerusalem, where he was placed in the dungeons of the king to await his execution.

What Was His Sin?

The following morning Yonadav set out for Jerusalem to find out the crime that his son-in-law was charged with, and to see what he could do for him.

IN the courtyard of the king he was told, “The sins and crimes with which your son-in-law is charged are indeed very grave. He has been linked with robbers and murderers for many years, and we will bring him before the court, where he will be sentenced to be hung from the highest tree.

Yonadav Returns Home

Yonadav was stricken at these words and his soul felt mortified as he thought that he allowed his daughter to marry such a man. Hurrying home he told his daughter: “My daughter, forget this man and drive his memory from your heart. Forget that you ever knew him for he is unworthy of you.”

Zemira, however, would not listen to her father and she answered him saying: “Do not speak thusly father. I cannot believe that the wonderful, kind and gentle man who I married could ever have done the terrible things of which he has been accused. Until I hear it from his own lips, I say all the charges that have been lodged against him are false.

“I intend to take my child with me and go before the king in Jerusalem to ask him for mercy for my beloved husband.”

When Yonadov heard this he collapsed in great despair. Nothing that the doctors could do was of any avail and he died.

Zemira Goes To Jerusalem

When the days of mourning for her father had come to an end, Zemira took her child an set out on the long journey to Jerusalem.

After many days she finally arrived in the Jewish capital – on the holiday of Sukkos. As she walked about the streets, she could see thousands upon thousands of Jews from all parts of Israel, who had come to celebrate the festival in the beautiful Holy Temple. Their faces were smiling, and joy filled the streets. Only Zemira’s heart was heavy and tears streamed down her face as she walked.

A Stranger Aids Her

As she walked, a stranger noticed her tears. Approaching her, he asked: “Why do you cry, young woman?”

Share Button

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

No Responses to “The Earthquake (Part II)”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Mock Eviction Notice shoved under the doors of students' rooms in predominantly Jewish NYU dorm by NYU SJP.
NYU Latest Site of Anti-Israel Mock Eviction Notices
Latest Kidz Stories
Tales of the Gaonim-logo

“The mitzvah of drawing water for the baking of the matzah for the Seder comes only once a year. I do not care to share it with a horse.’’

Tales-of-The-Midrash-logo

“You speak foolishly, daughter, how is it possible for a man who has not eaten for 10 years to live?”

Tales of the Gaonim-logo

With enthusiasm, zemiros that had been purposefully collected for the evening were chanted.

Tales of the Gaonim-logo

Bnei Yisrael marched out of Mitzrayim with a mighty hand under their great leader Moshe. This was not, however, their first attempt to escape from Mitzrayim and return to the land that G-d had promised their fathers.

Rabi Pinchas’ piety and honesty were known far and wide. He would often say, “Even though our Sages (Yevamot 65b) declared that to preserve the peace, a person may change his words to fit the situation, I will never utter a false word regardless of the consequences.” If he heard that one of his followers had uttered a false word, he would expel him from his presence.

When Bnei Yisrael returned to their homeland they were a poor and weak group of people. Because of the great number of enemies and wild animals that had inhabited the land during their exile, they huddled together in a few areas, like Yerushalayim, in order to find protection.

But not everyone is destined to taste of the fruit of this world and to enjoy its vintage. Among the inhabitants of this town lived a poor man, Nachumka.

In the midst of his merrymaking, the king ordered his servants to bring out the golden vessels that were taken from the Beit HaMikdash by his father Nevuchadnezzar. The king and his men drank from them and praised the gods of gold and silver.

The Jewish people are hardly strangers to persecution and tyranny. When we hear of the complaints of other peoples, we smile bitterly and wonder: What do they know of persecution? What do they know of tragedy and bitterness? We are a people who have experienced oppression for centuries and have drunk deeply of the bitter cup of woe.

Although Daniel was the chief minister in Bavel, he could not eradicate the custom practiced in many provinces of worshipping idols. In the capital city there was a statue of Baal and more and more people began to worship it. Even the king was beginning to believe in its power.

There was once a tzaddik from Poland, Reb Velveli, who decided to settle in Eretz Yisrael. The land was poor and inhabited by very few people, but he and his wife had such love for the land that they were willing to suffer privation and hunger just to be one of its citizens.

Through the influence of Daniel, one of Nevuchadnezar’s ministers, his three companions, Chananiah, Mishael and Azariah were appointed as governors over various provinces in Bavel.

The stories concerning Rav Naftali of Ropshitz are quite numerous and reveal his sharp biting wit. Rav Naftali was often persecuted and sneered at by misnagdim but the sharp mind with which he was blessed always served him in good stead in finding proper answers.

In the third year of the reign of Yehoyakim, melech Yehuda, Nevuchadnezzar, melech Bavel, lay siege to Yerushalayim and conquered it. He took many treasures from the Beis HaMikdash back with him to the land of Shinar.

Reb Moshe Chaim Ephraim, the grandson of the Baal Shem Tov, was a deeply learned man who took his sources and admonitions from the Torah.

In the city of Antioch there lived a man of remarkable generosity by the name of Aba Yehudah. He was a man who gave to all, whenever there was a need. Rabi Yehoshua and several other rabbanim arrived in the city one day on an urgent mission to collect money for the unfortunate needy. They knew that Aba Yehudah always gave a generous contribution so they looked forward to seeing him.

More Articles from Rabbi Sholom Klass
Tales of the Gaonim-logo

“The mitzvah of drawing water for the baking of the matzah for the Seder comes only once a year. I do not care to share it with a horse.’’

Tales-of-The-Midrash-logo

“You speak foolishly, daughter, how is it possible for a man who has not eaten for 10 years to live?”

With enthusiasm, zemiros that had been purposefully collected for the evening were chanted.

Bnei Yisrael marched out of Mitzrayim with a mighty hand under their great leader Moshe. This was not, however, their first attempt to escape from Mitzrayim and return to the land that G-d had promised their fathers.

Rabi Pinchas’ piety and honesty were known far and wide. He would often say, “Even though our Sages (Yevamot 65b) declared that to preserve the peace, a person may change his words to fit the situation, I will never utter a false word regardless of the consequences.” If he heard that one of his followers had uttered a false word, he would expel him from his presence.

When Bnei Yisrael returned to their homeland they were a poor and weak group of people. Because of the great number of enemies and wild animals that had inhabited the land during their exile, they huddled together in a few areas, like Yerushalayim, in order to find protection.

But not everyone is destined to taste of the fruit of this world and to enjoy its vintage. Among the inhabitants of this town lived a poor man, Nachumka.

In the midst of his merrymaking, the king ordered his servants to bring out the golden vessels that were taken from the Beit HaMikdash by his father Nevuchadnezzar. The king and his men drank from them and praised the gods of gold and silver.

    Latest Poll

    Now that Kerry's "Peace Talks" are apparently over, are you...?







    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/kidz/midrash-stories/the-earthquake-2/2012/06/04/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: