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March 4, 2015 / 13 Adar , 5775
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The Wicked Herod

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Herod or Hordos — as he is known in the Talmud — was a usurper who seized the throne of the Chashmonaim and caused a terrible tragedy to befall the Jewish people.

Herod was a servant in the House of the Chashmonaim. One day, when he was alone, he heard a voice cry out from the Heavens:

“Any servant who revolts at this time will succeed.”

Immediately, Herod arose and killed all the members of the House of the Chashmonaim, except for one small child whom he loved deeply.

Fearing that the rabbanim would rebel against him because of this verse, he had them all put to death except for one, Bava Ben Buta, in order that he might benefit from his wisdom. He did not, however, allow him to escape unscathed. He put on his eyes a garland of thorns and blinded him.

Herod was still not free from his suspicions, and decided to test Bava Ben Buta. Disguising his voice, he approached him one day and engaged him in conversation.

“Have you seen this wicked slave do the terrible acts of murder?”

“What can I do?” replied Bava.

“Curse him!”

Bava Ben Buta shook his head, “I cannot, for it says, ‘Even in your knowledge you shall not curse a king.’”

“But he is not really a king,” answered Herod.

“Even if he were only a leader, does it not say in the Torah, ‘A leader of your nation you shall not curse?’ ”

“Yes,” replied Herod, “but that is only a leader who acts in the interests of the nation, whereas this one acts contrary to those interests.”

“I am afraid,” said Bava, “lest someone hears me.”

“How can a man hear you?” replied Herod, “there are only the two of us present here.”

“It says in Koheles,” replied Bava, “that the bird of the heavens shall carry the voice.”

When Herod heard this, he was amazed and said: “I am Herod. Had I known that the Sages of Israel were so careful I would never have slain them. Tell me now, in what way can a man such as myself repent for his deeds?”

“There is a way. You extinguished the light of the world (the rabbanim), as it is said: ‘For a mitzvah is a candle and the Torah is light.’ Go now and rebuilt the Beis HaMikdash, which is the light of the world. You blinded the eyes of the world, go and repair the eyes of the world.”

Herod Agrees

Herod hesitated for a moment. “I am afraid of the power of Rome. They will not allow me to rebuild and beautify the Beis HaMikdash and the walls.”

“You need not tell them right away,” replied Bava. “Send a messenger to Rome asking permission. It will take a year for him to get there and it will take a second year to return.

“You begin as soon as he leaves. By the time he returns, you will be finished.”

Herod agreed to send a messenger and finished the work. The Romans, upon receiving the request, suspected Herod and sent him the following message:

“If you have not yet torn down the old building — stop. If you have torn it town and not finished building the new one — stop. If you have done everything — you are indeed a wicked slave. Is this the way of an honest man, to go ahead with his plan and afterwards to ask permission?

“You may strut about in your armor and royal garments, but we know your true origins. You are neither a king nor the son of kings. You are Herod, the slave who rebelled against his master.”

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One Response to “The Wicked Herod”

  1. 1500 years ago when these aggadot were compiled , calling someone a slave who had rebelled was properly derogatory; in the past 300 years as society has come to abhor slavery, it might not necessarily convey the same message – particularly to children who were never intended to take the aggadot of the Talmud as bedtime stories.

    This is clearly not material for children regardless of how dumbed-down it has been (and there is no question that the kind folks at the JP do "dumb-down" very well.

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“I wanted you to have a taste of the cold,” answered Rav Chaim. “This way, you too can feel the intense cold and realize the suffering of this man and his wife, who are now residing in a bitterly cold house.”

Gaonim-Midrash-logo-NEW

“Don’t worry,” said the king, “what could it be worth, two or three talents of gold? I’ll give you ten talents of gold, so you can forget about it.”

Shmuel HaKatan shook his head and said: “No, what happened here today is a sign not of great love. On the contrary, it is a bad omen.”

The arguments, however, could never appease his wife and one Thursday she came to him for money to purchase food for Shabbos.

He walked out of the room, making sure to leave the door ajar so that the two litigants could hear his voice.

Don’t you know Avraham, the famous dry goods merchant, who lives near the lake in a big mansion?

“What could I do? Your wife is hard of hearing,” whispered the poor woman barely able to talk.

“I would appreciate if you could give me some pointers on how to improve my wine,” said the wine merchant eagerly.

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