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20 COMMENTS

  1. Well I like the idea, but jewish community needs to grow in that communities can get together and meet people. On the other hand, there is always a mother telling her son, “She’s pretty and a nice Jewish girl” and to the daughter, “He’s smart, good looking, and jewish” with a big grin. But, some how they look at this as a set up, when it’s really – hey check them out, you never know 😉 We love our kids and want them happy:) and when you don’t have to deal with religious issues it’s so much easier.

  2. I am just saying you can marry who ever you want and who ever you love. I am not racist or making a rule I am saying that when you get married it is easier to marry someone with the same religious beliefs. I say this because when you marry a person who has the same religious convictions as yourself it is much easier to raise children, celebrate religious holidays, financial issues, etc. If Christians marry Christians is easy you both eat same foods, celebrate holidays etc. If Jewish religion and married to Christian it is hard, to raise Children, kosher/non-kosher, holidays Hannakah/Christmas, let alone decide on what day is the day if rest. All this doesn’t even matter if you don’t have any religious convictions, but if you do just think about it- if you plan on getting married once in a life time and for 50 years or more and you have religious convictions either Buddhist, Hindu, Christian, etc- it’s easier less stress if you marry someone of the same faith. Majority not all Mormons, Catholics, and Muslims still do practice this.

  3. I am a Jewish man married to a woman who was raised Catholic but who is essentially an atheist. However, we are raising our two daughters within the Jewish faith and have this reflects in our home. Although not religious she serves an active part in synagogue life where my daughters are concerned. I think you can marry a non-Jew and still live a Jewish life and instill Jewish heritage and values in our children.

  4. I have to say that I think one of the major causes of loss of Jewish identity among children of couples in which one person is Jewish and the other is not, is that there’s so much ostracizing in the community of both the Jewish parent and the resulting child. We should encourage Jews to marry other Jews, but treating people who marry out as if they’re traitors isn’t helpful, nor is making comments like “how could a Jew and a non-Jew truly love each other?” which there’s a fair bit of in here.

    A better solution is to outreach to the resulting children and make sure that their Jewish identity remains strong, rather than being insulting to their parents.

    Personally, my children are as halachically Jewish as any of the commenters here, my husband is atheist and so not a member of any other religion, and I am sending them to day school and raising them in the Jewish faith. My kids will likely end up with more knowledge and passion for Judaism than quite a few people who consider themselves more “pure” or doubt that I could love my husband.

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