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16th Century Ladino Women’s Siddur Reissued in Hebrew

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A 500-year-old Sephardi women’s prayer book is being reissued in Hebrew.

Seder Nashim, created in the 16th century by Rabbi Meir Benbenishti, was originally written in Ladino because most women in Europe who used it did not know Hebrew, Ynet reported.

The siddur will be published by the Ben Zvi Institute.

Benbenishti taught his daughters to read and write in Ladino and recommended that every man “teach his daughter a little writing every evening,” the report said.

The women’s siddur features regular halachot, or Jewish laws, regarding women and general Jewish laws on topics such as the rules of the eruv, mezuzahs and more. It also includes a haggadah for women holding a Passover seder on their own, which is written in the feminine gender grammatically, according to Ynet.

In addition, the traditional morning blessing of thanking God “who has not made me a woman” is not in the siddur and no other version of the prayer was put in its place, according to the report.

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2 Responses to “16th Century Ladino Women’s Siddur Reissued in Hebrew”

  1. 16th century progressive? Or has Judaism always been accommodating to women, regardless of what the "enlightened" continue to espouse in their hateful anti-Orthodox rhetoric?

  2. Muriel Coudurier-Curveur says:

    I think most Orthodox men should ask themselves whether the rules they imposes on the women are part of the Torah, or just the outside influence of Galut on Judaism.
    For example, long before Benbenishti, both Rashi and Maimonides considered that daughters should be taught Torah, and Talmud if possible, and that they were allowed to wear tsitsit and tallitot if they found it helpful for concentrating on their prayers, yet nowadays, women who dare wear a tallit at the Kotel are arrested and I'd bet I'd be spat upon if I went out of my home wearing tsitsit in spite of the fact that Torah mandates all (including women and slave) to wear them.

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