Photo Credit:
The Frankfurt Mishneh Torah, circa 1457-1465. Estimate $4.5/6 million.

A sense of continuity is really the underlying theme in this collection. From the introductory hall illuminating the Jewish life cycle and Jewish Holy Days to the objects being auctioned, like the torah bindings, tefillin boxes, and menorahs. These are all things that as a Jew, you are familiar with whether it is because you observe it or consider it part of a culture.

The continuity of Judaism is so clearly evident and that thread is what makes the collection great. That ability to make what is old feel current, familiar, and personal. The collection is a slice of Jewish history and culture through art and that is what I love about art the most. No piece of art or antiquity stands on its own. It comes from a time and place and a history. This collection acknowledges that history without being limited to it.

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1 COMMENT

  1. That Mishneh Torah, the most valuable piece in the collection, was just sold just prior to the auction, to a consortium of the Israel Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, price unspecified. My guess that it'll divide its time between the two institutions. So we'll all get a chance to see it after all. (This was reported on Bloomberg News.)

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