Photo Credit: Yonatan Sindel/Flash90

On Sunday morning, the traditional Birkat Cohanim, Blessing of the Priests, was held in the Kotel plaza. The Kotel was packed.

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Next year on the Temple Mount.

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22 COMMENTS

  1. I feel like Abraham now – Just one more question…so you are saying that all Katz’s are Cohenim except those that are wannabes. Isn’t it a contradiction to say “all…except for those that are not” – I mean, “all” doesn’t allow for any exceptions, no?

  2. By the Jewish law the Cohen title is passed from father to son. However, sometimes children, for various reasons, take the family name of a mother. In such a case they are not Cohanim, whether they bear the family names of Cohen, Katz, Kagan, etc.

  3. I feel like Abraham now – Just one more question…so you are saying that all Katz's are Cohenim except those that are wannabes. Isn't it a contradiction to say "all…except for those that are not" – I mean, "all" doesn't allow for any exceptions, no?

  4. By the Jewish law the Cohen title is passed from father to son. However, sometimes children, for various reasons, take the family name of a mother. In such a case they are not Cohanim, whether they bear the family names of Cohen, Katz, Kagan, etc.

  5. Yes, Alex, there are many anomalous reasons why someone named Katz or Cohen might not be a kohen. Foremost among these was the desire to avoid the Czar’s army, and as Russian Orthodox priests were exempt, often so were kohamin. There are also halakhic reasons, but no need to delve in that!

  6. Yes, Alex, there are many anomalous reasons why someone named Katz or Cohen might not be a kohen. Foremost among these was the desire to avoid the Czar's army, and as Russian Orthodox priests were exempt, often so were kohamin. There are also halakhic reasons, but no need to delve in that!

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