The Supreme Court has ordered Tel Aviv to enforce the law that prohibits stores from operating on the Sabbath. It overruled a February ruling by a lower court, which accepted the city’s claim that it carried out its responsibility by fining business owners without a need to force them to close.

The three-judge panel, including Court President Asher Grunis, ruled that under the “current legal management, the municipality in effect allows violating the law.” He added that there is concern that the city prefers to profit more from sales on Shabbat than it can collect from fining businesses violating the law.

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6 COMMENTS

  1. Suzy, that is not true. Over 60% of Israelis are TRADITIONAL Jews. It is U.S. Jews that like to use labels such as "secular," "ultra-orthodox," "orthodox," etc.

  2. Suzy, that is not true. Over 60% of Israelis are TRADITIONAL Jews. It is U.S. Jews that like to use labels such as "secular," "ultra-orthodox," "orthodox," etc.

  3. Suzy, that is not true. Over 60% of Israelis are TRADITIONAL Jews. It is U.S. Jews that like to use labels such as "secular," "ultra-orthodox," "orthodox," etc.

  4. Even some traditional Jews spend money on Saturdays, otherwise the beaches, restaurants, cinemas would be empty as well as the roads. It is clear that the majority of citizens in Israel are for places to be open on Saturdays. No one is forcing anyone to buy or enjoy themselves on Saturday, closing shops on the other hand forces people to stay at home and I am against forcing anyone. I want to live in a free democratic country where people do what they want without interference from the government, so change the law

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