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Open Society Foundations chairman and founder George Soros.

This article first appeared on JewishBusinessNews

George Soros’ most recent SEC 13-F filing showed a 605% increase in his short S&P 500 position, taking the short position of his Soros Funds Management Portfolio on the S&P 500 from 2.96% to a whopping 16.65%.

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The Australian Business Insider believes the large jump in the size and percentage of this put position means Soros is worried about where the S&P is headed in the months ahead when the fed turn off the quantitative easing stimulants.

“Where the S&P goes so likely goes the ASX200 if Soros is right,” writes the BI’s Greg McKenna, adding: “so we’ve been warned.”

Incidentally, George Soros turned 84 this week. According to the Irish Times, the old lad’s Quantum fund has generated just under $40 billion in profits over the last 40 years or so, making him the most successful hedge fund manager ever.

Soros is basically about short selling, betting on the market to take a dive. His most notorious bet was in September 1992, when his shorting of the English pound forced the Bank of England to devalue the currency and leave the European Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM), the IT reminded readers.

Soros earned at least $2 billion on that one, going down in history as the man who broke the Bank of England.

Yeah…

Soros came out of retirement in 2007 just for the 2008 disaster, when, unlike most investors, he felt right at home.

Last year, Soros’s fund earned $1 billion, give or take, by shorting the Japanese yen.

Yeah…

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10 COMMENTS

  1. Look, I don’t care for George Schwartz’ politics, but the guy knows a thing or two about the stock market. If he’s shorting, investors should take notice.

  2. Highly entertaining that publications which generally can’t stand Soros #schwartz, ie., jewish press, Fox, Newsmax are running with this, attaching a doomsday headline. Reason is fairly obvious. Betting the market will drop isn’t particularly noteworthy when we’re at historic highs. Nothing goes up forever. Suggesting a market crash is another story, at least outside the NASDAQ.

  3. Andrea Green Santos perhaps. Certain Georgie doesn’t want too many investors to short along with him – but it doesn’t take a genius to see that withdrawal of QE should result in a deflation of the artificial market highs.

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