Photo Credit: Atta Jabr / Flash 90
Syrian refugees at the Zaatari refugee camp in Northern Jordan.

On Thursday, June 12, the ministers of each of Germany’s 16 states agreed to a plan proposed by Germany’s Foreign Minister last month to accept an additional 1o,000 Syrian refugees into Germany.

In May 2013, Germany agreed to grant 5,000 Syrians asylum, and that number doubled by year’s end. The latest commitment of an additional 10,000 doubled the official number again.

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Thus far fleeing Syrians have to apply for a visa, but even Syrians who enter Germany without approved visas are currently allowed to stay. Germany is not deporting anyone back to Syria while the war continues.

Syria’s tiny neighboring country of Lebanon has absorbed nearly one million Syrian refugees since the war began. Following Lebanon, Turkey, Jordan, Iraq and Egypt are the countries to which the most Syrians have fled their war-torn country.

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Lori Lowenthal Marcus is a contributor to the JewishPress.com. A graduate of Harvard Law School, she previously practiced First Amendment law and taught in Philadelphia-area graduate and law schools. You can reach her by email: Lori@JewishPressOnline.com

12 COMMENTS

  1. Europe gets their share of un-absorbable Arabs to their countries. Already strife comparable to that of Israel and the Pal-Arabs has taken place in big cities. In Malmoe, the medium size city of Sweden, Arab-Muslim emigrants get their way by threats and rude intimidation towards the ingenious inhabitants. – Some predict that in at least fifteen years-time clusters of semi-wars will be imminent all over the Western part of Europe. The Arabs simply bring their culture of hatred with them.

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