web analytics
October 25, 2014 / 1 Heshvan, 5775
At a Glance
News & Views
Sponsored Post
Meir Panim with Soldiers 5774 Roundup: Year of Relief and Service for Israel’s Needy

Meir Panim implements programs that serve Israel’s neediest populations with respect and dignity. Meir Panim also coordinated care packages for families in the South during the Gaza War.



Living in Divine Space: Art Connecting Us to God and to Each Other

J. Reznik Studios, owned and run by artist Jodi Reznik and her husband Jeff, has been using art to bridge communities.
1011829_10151693664285631_1842869603_n

By Ari Zeigler and Yaakov Bressler

As the stereotype goes, Jewish mothers will brag about having a doctor or a lawyer in the family. While the fact is that Jewish mothers will brag about having just about anything in the family, perhaps we should start thinking about adding another profession to that list: Artist.

Orthodox Judaism is not necessarily known for its pantheon of artists. For an Orthodox Jew to get serious about a hobby or a career through art isn’t viewed as the noblest of causes.

But maybe it should be.

In Genesis 1:27, it’s relayed that God created man in His image, meaning that whatever ends up a part of us – hands, feet, fingers, feelings – is an aspect of God revealed—in whatever small measure—to the world.

The universe is, in many ways, God’s great work of art. Therefore, by understanding something about ourselves and the world around us and by binding that understanding in some physical, worldly way, we can begin to understand something about God. The fact that art exists reveals some facet of the Divine.

So, how does this revelation through art manifest itself in the real world? According to some artists, it does just that, connects us to the Divine.

“Whenever a person acts, they create an angel,” says Jeff Reznik, owner and manager of J. Reznik Studios. “That angel is a representation of their good (or bad) actions. When an artist creates an image, they are creating a divine space where a ‘spirit’ lives. By looking at art, talking, sharing or feeling art, one enters that divine space.”

It’s not just building a connection to God that drives artists in the Jewish community. J. Reznik Studios, owned and run by artist Jodi Reznik and her husband Jeff, has been using art to bridge communities for years. Their “Fallen Angel Project,” where the families of police officers killed in the line of duty were given—free of charge—portraits of their loved one, was received with appreciation and admiration. Additionally, pieces of Ms. Reznik’s works were given to several European and Asian embassies as a show of appreciation for their efforts in saving WWII refugees.

Recently, the studio hosted an exhibition appropriately named “Living in Divine Space,” featuring works of 11 local Jewish artists. Not only did this exhibition serve as a platform for these artists’ work, it also served as a springboard for remarkable charity in the community as all the participating artists volunteered at Masbia, a nonprofit soup kitchen network and food pantry that provides meals for hundreds of needy New Yorkers.

A portion of the exhibitions proceeds are also to be donated to the Masbia initiative, which, in addition to its hot meal program, provides bags of groceries every week to those with not enough at home, through their weekend take-home package program.

“When planning the show, our thoughts were on how to reach out to the community and give to those in need,” says Dovid Orlansky, featured artist and curator of the exhibition. “Helping others means we have the opportunity to give of ourselves and our goal is to satiate the needs of those who are hungry; spiritually, physically and emotionally. Living in Divine Space is not just a show, it’s a mindset.”

Featured artist Yitzchok Moully was excited for the opportunity to inspire others by both sharing his art and using it as a platform for charity. “It is truly wonderful to create a work of art that can impact the viewer as well as be an instrument in bringing good through a portion of sales going to such a worthy cause,” said Moully. “I look forward to participating in person at Masbia.”

Another featured artist, Shoshannah Brombacher, says she’s glad to showcase art from a frum perspective as a more than noble endeavor. “It proves that the artists ‘live’ their art by incorporating their mitzvot in their art and their art in mitzvot. We, frum artists, work from a Torah perspective while creating beauty.”

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Living in Divine Space: Art Connecting Us to God and to Each Other”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Israel's Minister of Defense Moshe Ya'alon, visiting the family of  IDF Golani Brigade soldier St.-Sgt. Oron Shaul in the northern village of Poria on August 10, 2014. Shaul was killed by Hamas in Gaza during Operation Protective Edge.
State Department Continues Grudge Match Against Ya’alon
Latest News Stories
Liberman and Ariel

Minister of Foreign Affairs, Avigdor Liberman (L) speaks with Israel’s Minister of Housing and Construction Uri Ariel during a cornerstone laying ceremony for a new Synagogue in the community of Nokdim in Eastern Gush Etzion, on October 23, 2014. Nokdim is Liberman’s home town. This is what we think they spoke about.

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi declared a three-month state of emergency Saturday after terrorists carried out a deadly assault in the northern Sinai, killing 33 Egyptian troops. Al-Sisi charged that “this operation had a foreign fund to execute” he attack against the Egyptian army… to break the back of Egypt and Egyptians.” A car bomb […]

Israeli police shoot tear gas to disperse Arab rioters throwing rocks after Friday prayers in Arab neighborhoods n Jerusalem.

Arab youth are trying to spark a widespread intifada but so far have failed.

Broken headstones and monuments in the Mount of Olives cemetery.

Jewish headstones and monuments were smashed, broken and knocked over. Firebombs were thrown into the cemetery.

The Galil Medical Center has treated 408 wounded Syrians to date.

At least 14 people have been killed in Tripoli battles.

The US sends its “condolences” and urges “all parties…to avoid escalating tensions.”

Kerry snubs Ya’alon, but the Israeli D.M. gets great press coverage in leading U.S. newspaper.

India has chosen to purchase Israel’s Spike anti-tank missiles after rejecting a competing offer for US Lockheed Martin’s Javelin missiles.

The first of 2 nurses to contract Ebola in Texas has been cured. NY and NJ have begun quarantining health-care workers returning from West Africa.

“Mourning” a terrorist means carrying the torch of terror.

Israel changes it clocks Sunday morning at 2 AM.

Terrorist attack in NYC and in Canada came after ISIS urged Muslims in the West to strike police and soldiers.

“For these international artists, the history and heroism at Masada together with performing at the lowest point on earth – 424 meters under the sea – is something that is truly unique,” Yossef explained.

At best, the Hareidim have been eating “Heter Mechira”. At worse, they’ve been eating vegetables grown in sewer water or pesticides from unknown and unsupervised Arabs fields.

More Articles from Guest Author
Raphael Elisha Meir Cohen

It has been a very challenging year that has taken a toll on the Cohen family.

Professor Alan Dershowitz

I was touched by his words on the struggle to stand up for Israel.

A Tribute to Rabbi Joseph Grunblatt zt”l

Until you come to see it in person, enjoy Jerusalem’s Botanical Garden virtually via this video!

After four earthquakes shake Israel in one week, experts debate whether the big one is imminent.

The art show represents its theme, the identity of joy in Judaism.

Our human GPS who loves geography, maps and anything mass transit, to actually GO to the places he constantly reads about.

We should remind each other of the value of Israel in our lives every chance we get.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/breaking-news/living-in-divine-space-art-connecting-us-to-god-and-to-each-other/2013/06/28/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: