ThePrime Minister’s Office said Thursday that preparations have been completed for Pope Francis’ visit to Israel. But the release failed to mention the fact that religious Jews in Judea and Samaria, Ranana and elsewhere have been taken into police custody to ensure that peaceful protesters do not disturb the Papal visit.

In recent weeks, said a statement from the PMO, spokespersons from the National Information Directorate, the President’s Residence, the Foreign Ministry, the Tourism Ministry, the Government Press Office, the Israel Police, the Municipality of Jerusalem, the Defense Ministry, the ISA and Yad Vashem have met repeatedly in recent weeks to coordinate Francis’ two day visit.

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The statement celebrates a special logo that has been created for the visit, In this framework an information and media readiness plan was formulated ahead of the visit that “expresses the link between the Vatican and Israel and interfaith friendship.” A national media center, staffed by multi-lingual personnel, will “welcome the hundreds of foreign journalists that will arrive to cover the papal visit,” who will receive will receive information kits, including a special disk-on-key with information about the State of Israel in a variety of areas.”

But it is likely that the “information packets” will not include Thursday’s Tweet by Micky Rosenfeld, foreign press spokesman for the Israel Police.

“Police hand out 4 day restraining order to several right-wing activists ahead of popes visit to prevent any provocative incidents occurring”.

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6 COMMENTS

  1. The restraining order are an unfortunate but practical necessity to prevent an international incident that would reflect poorly on Israel and its Jewish citizens. IOW to prevent a chilul haShem. Handled properly this can be a great kiddush haShem.

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