Photo Credit: Courtesy Middle East Program for Interventional Epidemiology Training
30 health professionals from Israel and the PA at a course on cross-border disease control

Dr. Avi Peretz, Director of the Institute of Microbiology Research at the Baruch Padeh Medical Center, in Poriya, south of Tveria, was among the Israeli medical and research personnel who participated in a joint course with their counterparts from the Palestinian Authority on Applied Epidemiology.

Epidemiology is the study and analysis of the patterns, causes, and effects of health and disease conditions in defined populations. It is the cornerstone of public health, shaping policy decisions and evidence-based practice by identifying risk factors for disease and targets for preventive healthcare.

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Thirty professionals engaged in public health, infectious diseases and Epidemiology participated in the course which was organized by the National Center for Disease Control.

The six-day Middle East Program for Interventional Epidemiology Training (MEPIET) course dealt with applied Epidemiology in an international format. Its goal was to train a reserve of professionals with the knowledge and skill of applied Epidemiology to investigate outbreaks of unusual morbidity, and to expand cooperation between various organizations involved in the field at the national and regional level.

Dr. Avi Peretz said, “The course gave me epidemiological tools for investigating outbreaks and unusual morbidity events. During the course we practiced statistical tools for analyzing the results of an epidemiological investigation, and experienced collaboration on cross-border epidemiological investigations, and coordination on international health regulations.”

Dr. Peretz said he cherished the opportunity to meet professionals from the Palestinian Authority, as well as colleagues from the Israeli Health Ministry, Agriculture Ministry, and the IDF Medical Corps.

“There is no doubt that the tools we have acquired will assist us at the Medical Center should we have to deal with unusual morbidity events,” he said.

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