web analytics
August 30, 2015 / 15 Elul, 5775
At a Glance
News & Views
Sponsored Post


Scientists Cultivated At Young Age By Israel’s Technoda

Israeli scientists are cultivated at young ages by Technoda. (Photo: Technoda)

Israeli scientists are cultivated at young ages by Technoda. (Photo: Technoda)

On the one hand, Givat Olga is an underprivileged neighborhood in the Israeli city of Hadera with about 12,000 people, primarily immigrants from Ethiopia, North Africa and the former Soviet Union. On the other, the neighborhood is home to the breeding ground for Israel’s next generation of science pioneers.

The decision to build Technoda – Israel’s National Museum of Science, Planning and Technology – in Givat Olga brought educational resources to children who previously had limited access to them.

Technoda got off the ground in 1986 with the support of the Rashi Foundation. One of Technoda’s founding fathers, Zion Bash, a senior engineer at Intel, helped develop an educational program with a focal point of enrichment in the sciences.

Twenty students took part in the first iteration of the Technoda program, which now provides more than 30,000 children per year with a hands-on science and general education. Students range from gan (pre-kindergarten) to high school.

“A small room has become a castle,” Dr. Gadi Mador, Technoda’s director, said in an interview with JNS.

“One of the basic elements for the future of Israel is to be, first and foremost, strong in science and technology,” he says. “Education is a journey that must start in kindergarten and continue throughout high school.”

Mador emphasizes that Technoda is the only place in Israel where all sectors of the population learn together under the same roof – religious and secular Jews as well as Arab Christians, Muslims and Druze.

The project’s goals, he says, are “first, to promote science and technology in Israel, and second, to bring together all elements of Israeli society on the common ground of science.”

A day at Technoda begins promptly at 8 a.m. Three morning programs are run simultaneously, with each geared to a specific age group. In the first section, the preschool class, even fairy tales become a vehicle for understanding science and technology.

“There is a special space for kids,” Mador says. “Technoda materials are integrated into the classroom topics. Material is provided to start the learning process in the school. Each gan program is two months long. Each of the five units per year culminates with a visit to [the] Technoda [museum].”

Technoda works with the Israeli Education Ministry to identify kids in the third grade who qualify to become part of its Gifted Program. The program continues through high school in an ongoing enrichment experience, both in science and general cultural education. Once a week, throughout the academic year, Technoda students study core scientific knowledge. As part of the high school curriculum, the young scientists visit high-tech companies.

Dr. Gadi Mador, director of Technoda. (Photo: Maxine Dovere)

Dr. Gadi Mador, director of Technoda. (Photo: Maxine Dovere)

“Seeing companies at work helps encourage work values,” Mador says.

The Technoda program goes beyond science. As part of its agenda, students have an opportunity to give back to the community. For example, they volunteer to work with children with disabilities.

“It’s not easy, but they enjoy working with these kids,” Mador says. “It’s an opportunity to help someone and give back.”

While the formal science and general education programs take place in the morning, afternoons at Technoda take on a more local flavor. The museum portion becomes a “home away from home to 400 children from Givat Olga,” Mador says.

Israeli children often grow up in the same towns as where their parents were raised, a situation that is true for many of the children in Givat Olga, according to Mador.

“We take them to another life, providing a hot meal, homework programs and an opportunity to participate in science and technology,” he says.

Technoda “cannot be just a museum – otherwise there is no support of children in Givat Olga,” Mador adds.

A results-oriented initiative, Technoda measures everything “from the point of view of both quantity and quality,” revealing what Mador calls “a real correlation between the rates of success [of Givat Olga children] and having this sort of opportunity.”

“There is a special group for potentially gifted children in the local community,” Mador says. “We recognize their potential.”

Mador came to Technoda in 1991 as a graduate student in physics and math. One of his professors asked him to come to Givat Olga to teach, and he has never left. His initial years with the project came during the first Palestinian intifada.

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

2 Responses to “Scientists Cultivated At Young Age By Israel’s Technoda”

  1. Eva Feld says:

    that's how its done, languages, sciences, technology the young brains absorb that stuff likek sponges.

  2. The perfection of perfections, mathematics.

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
Dr. Ben Carson (left) at the Western Wall in December 2014.
Pro-Israel Carson Breathing Down Neck of Pro-Israel Trump
Latest News Stories
Dr. Ben Carson (left) at the Western Wall in December 2014.

Both Carson and Trump are solidly behind Israel, but their real drawing card is that they are not politicians.

Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon.

Oregon’s Jeff Merkley announced he is backing the nuclear deal, leaving Obama only three shy of a veto-proof majority.

A natural gas drill rig in the Mediterranean.

The gas field is far larger than those discovered off Israel’s coast and will supply Egypt with gas for decades.

Israel’s Elbit Systems has racked up two more sales, this time by its cyber security subsidiary Cyberbit to a European police force and an African enforcement agency. Elbit, listed on NASDAQ, did not disclose the amount of the sales. It set up the Cyberbit subsidiary earlier this year to include the cyber and intelligence divisions […]

The regime’s Fars [Read “Farce”] News Agency reported that three Israelis and Jordanians were killed.

Jaffa port is a nice little port with a pleasant promenade to walk around on.

Barenboim rejected from Iran because he’s a “Zionist”. The irony is overwhelming.

Debbie Wasserman Schultz, DNC chair, allegedly blocked a DNC resolution supporting the Iran Deal.

Dr. Sacks was one of the greatest, if not the greatest, neurologists.

Arab readers of the Arabic version of Aljazeera responded with astonishment at the restraint shown by an armed Israeli soldier, who was filmed while a group of female villagers physically assaulted him during a rally.

Palestinian Arab terrorists shot and wounded an Israeli driver on the road near Kedumim.

Firefighters in Galilee were able to stop a brush fire on Sunday from spreading into a wildfire.

An Israeli woman has allegedly flown to Turkey to cross the border into Syria to join ISIS.

PM Netanyahu told Italian PM Renzi during weekend talks in Florence Israel does not object to a “civilian” nuclear program in Iran.

The car headed towards a group of four soldiers in Hebron, striking one.

The ruler of the Principality of Monaco, Prince Albert II, on Thursday issued a formal apology for his country’s role in deporting Jews to Nazi death camps during World War II.

More Articles from Maxine Dovere
Israeli scientists are cultivated at young ages by Technoda. (Photo: Technoda)

On the one hand, Givat Olga is an underprivileged neighborhood in the Israeli city of Hadera with about 12,000 people, primarily immigrants from Ethiopia, North Africa and the former Soviet Union. On the other, the neighborhood is home to the breeding ground for Israel’s next generation of science pioneers.

Alice Walker

Police arrived when a confrontation between a screaming protester and a Walker supporter threatened to erupt into physical conflict.

Joseph (Yossel) Friedenson carried the title of “rabbi,” but his “pulpit” was far wider than any within four walls.

NEW YORK—Hurricane Sandy stormed into New York and New Jersey with unmitigated force, carrying death and destruction, disrupting lives, and devastating neighborhoods in America’s most densely populated regions – which happen to be home to some of the country’s largest Jewish populations.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/israel/scientists-cultivated-at-young-age-by-israels-technoda/2013/08/21/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: