Photo Credit: Daniel Tauber
Likud MK Tzipi Hotovely speaking to supporters.

The Likud’s highest ranking female candidate, MK Tzipi Hotovely called for the adoption of the Levy report and more construction in all parts of Israel at victory party last night in Or Yehuda, Israel, attended by hundreds of her supporters.

“Construction, construction, construction, in all parts of the country,” Hotovely declared.

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In the recent Likud primaries Hotovely won the 10th spot on the Likud’s list, making her the highest ranking female candidate from the Likud party. On the joint Likud-Beytenu list, Hotovely has the 15th spot.

Hotovely said that her victory shows that clean and principled politics can win out and called on voters to support the Likud so that the Likud can follow through with its pro-Land of Israel agenda.

Likud MK Tzipi Hotovely, 34, is an attorney and a doctorate student at the Faculty of Law in Tel Aviv University. She is Orthodox and describes herself as “religious right winger.” When she was first elected, at the tender age of 30, she was the youngest MK in history. But she is also a staunch defender of women’s rights and chairs the Knesset Committee on the Status of Women.

Hotovely’s parents immigrated from then Soviet Georgia.

She began to gain notoriety in Israel in 2006, when she became a regular panelist on a Channel 10 political show hosted by Dan Margalit and began to write a column for NRG. After joining Likud in 2008, she made it to the 18th spot on the party’s 2009 Knesset list and became an MK. In the November primaries she reached the 10th spot, making her one of her party’s top leaders.

Her views on settlements and legitimizing Israeli rule in Judea and Samaria are expected to play a major role in the next Netanyahu government, along with Danny Danon, who has the sixth place position.

Yori Yanover contributed to this report.

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8 COMMENTS

  1. Adoption of the Levy report would constitute a *de facto* annexation of the WB. If that is NOT accompanied by an offer of Israeli citizenship for the non-Jewish residents of the region, the accusation that Israel is an "Apartheid" state would have legs.

  2. I also think that it is an overstated concern. According to the Palestinian election commission, there are approximately one million registered voters in the WB. There were over five million registered voters in Israel as of the 2009 election. However, there would be dozens of Fatah and Hamas members in the Knesset. Do we really want that?

  3. Charlie — the portion of the territories where Jewish towns are located comes to about 7% of the so called "West bank" and it has between 80 and 100 thousand Arabs. If they wish to be part of the Jewish state, by all means they should receive citizenship. This is, essentially, the Bennet plan as well.

  4. The Bennet plan does not allow for a contiguous West Bank. I have no problem with drawing the borders to include the large Jewish population blocs, one of which I used to live in (Alon Shevut) and one of which I currently live in (Maale Adumim). I also have no problem with granting citizenship to those Arabs in the area who want it. Israel banned extreme right-wing Jewish parties; why would we lower our standards for extreme right-wing Muslim parties? The biggest problem with our post-disengagement attitude (championed by Bush) was: let Hamas run, democracy will triumph. How'd that work out?

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