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Two rabbis for two Jewish communities: Israel's new chief rabbis, Sephardi Rabbi Yitzchak Yosef (R) and Ashkenazi Rabbi David Lau.

There almost certainly are enough “secular” Knesset Members who are too deeply rooted in Jewish tradition to support a merger that is more likely to tear apart the People of Israel rather than unite it.

Arguments and differences of opinion are what made the Talmud so great.

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Can anyone imagine Jews not arguing about whether the single chief rabbi should be Sephardi or Ashkenazi.

And if they didn’t argue, how could the Jewish people survive?

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5 COMMENTS

  1. How about simply abolishing the post of Chief Rabbi altogether. The concept of a Chief Rabbi for the country is not even a Jewish concept. It was a creation of the British. In the UK, the Church of England is official state church. Other religions are free to operate and it has become the practice to have a leader in the UK to represent minority faiths. Some have a leader built in – the Catholics are represented by the senior member of the hierarchy in the UK. Jews had no such thing so this post of Chief Rabbi was invented in the UK and exported to British colonies and territories. When Israel gained independence, the Chief Rabbi system was maintained. However it was not ordained from Sinai. This post has become a political football and a lightning rod for conflict over differences in how one lives as a Jew etc. Time to get rid of this anachronism.

  2. Jews don't need any chief rabbis. My great-great uncle was Chief Rabbi of St. Louis. After he died (long before I was born), the City of St. Louis decided they needed Stan Musial much more than they needed a chief rabbi. A wise choice.

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