web analytics
October 21, 2014 / 27 Tishri, 5775
At a Glance
News & Views
Sponsored Post
Meir Panim with Soldiers 5774 Roundup: Year of Relief and Service for Israel’s Needy

Meir Panim implements programs that serve Israel’s neediest populations with respect and dignity. Meir Panim also coordinated care packages for families in the South during the Gaza War.



Would You Eat a Kosher, Lab-Grown Cheeseburger?

It’s not enough that kosher ersatz bacon is on the market. Now it’s kosher cheeseburgers, from “meat” grown in a lab, waiting for the cheese. The lab-grown burger cost only $325,000 to make. Two to go.
By:
cheeseburger

When the world’s first lab-grown burger was introduced and taste-tested on Monday, the event seemed full of promise for environmentalists, animal lovers and vegetarians.

Others who had good reason to be excited are kosher consumers.

The burger was created by harvesting stem cells from a portion of cow shoulder muscle that were multiplied in petri dishes to form tiny strips of muscle fiber. About 20,000 of the strips were needed to create the five-ounce burger, which was financed partially by Google founder Sergey Brin and unveiled by Mark Post of Maastricht University in the Netherlands.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) hailed the event as a “first step” toward humanely producing meat products. A University of Amsterdam study shows that lab-grown meat could significantly reduce the environmental impact of beef production.

For kosher-observant Jews, the “cultured” burgers could open the door to radical dietary changes — namely, the birth of the kosher cheeseburger. That’s because meat produced through this process could be considered parve – neither meat nor dairy — according to Rabbi Menachem Genack, CEO of the Orthodox Union’s kosher division.

Thus, under traditional Jewish law, the burger could be paired with dairy products, but several key conditions would have to be met to create kosher, parve cultured beef.

The tissue samples would have to come from an animal that had been slaughtered according to kosher rules, not from a biopsy from a live animal, Genack said. The principle underlying this theory is much like the status of gelatin in Jewish law: Though it is derived from an animal, it is not meat (the OU certifies some bovine-derived gelatin as parve). Genack noted another source for viewing cultured meat as parve: a 19th century Vilna-born scholar known as the Heshek Shlomo wrote that the meat of an animal conjured up in a magical incantation could be considered parve.

It may not be too much of a stretch, then, to apply the same logic to modern genetic wizardry. But kosher chefs aren’t heating up the parve griddles just yet.

The lab-born burger, which cost $325,000 and took two years to make, is still a long way from market viability, kosher or otherwise. If mass produced, it could still cost $30 per pound, researchers said.

“I’ll believe it when I see it,” said Jeff Nathan, the executive chef at Abigael’s on Broadway, a kosher restaurant in Manhattan. “Until it’s in my hands and I can touch it, smell it and taste it, I don’t believe it.”

Even if cultured beef became commonplace, consumers still might not be interested, said Elie Rosenfeld, a spokesman for Empire Kosher, the nation’s largest kosher poultry producer. “Parve burgers made of tofu and vegetables have been on the market for years,” Rosenfeld said. “But customers are still looking for the real deal, a product that’s wholesome and genuine.” Nevertheless, Nathan sounded an enthusiastic note about the potential for parve meat.

“I’m all for experimentation and science,” he said. “Let’s see what it tastes like.”

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

7 Responses to “Would You Eat a Kosher, Lab-Grown Cheeseburger?”

  1. Ch Hoffman says:

    If it isn't meat, it can still be unhealthy; of course I'd eat it.

  2. For certain we need Moshiach today.. we've gone insane!

  3. It is an attempt to further cause lackness in Kosher eating. Whom of you would start to eat this and then find out that some unscrupulous dealers used regular beef because it was cheaper and the cost to you the consumer was much higher. It is an attempt to make fast foods likeable to the future generations. To not remain koshe. I would hope that the OU Labs would not allow said same. It did come from an Cow to start.

  4. Dan Silagi says:

    No, but I'd certainly eat a cheeseburger where the cheese comes from a cow.

  5. Anthony Kent says:

    The announcement of birth of the kosher cheeseburger is somewhat premature. Wait till the big halachic authorities give their verdict on this before ordering a double with fries.

  6. Gil Gilman says:

    No!

  7. mydogpeter says:

    If, in your mind, it’s a cheeseburger, and you know you are not supposed to mix meat and dairy, who d’ya think you’re kidding?

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Photo of the Latin inscription set against the Rockefeller Museum, seat of the Israel Antiquities Authority in Jerusalem.
Rare 2,000 Yr Old Monument to Emperor Hadrian Found in Jerusalem
Latest News Stories
Photo of the Latin inscription set against the Rockefeller Museum, seat of the Israel Antiquities Authority in Jerusalem.

A 2,000 year old stone fragment bearing an official Latin inscription dedicated to the Roman Emperor Hadrian is found in Jerusalem.

Woman stoned by father and ISIS

The woman’s father and other ISIS members stoned the woman to death for adultery.

Hamas Museum 1

Hamas has created a museum exhibit, currently showing at al-Aqsa University in Khan Younis, Gaza. Hamas is showing off its weapons and propaganda pieces from this past summer’s war, Operation Protective Edge.  

A bill that would end the control of the Chief Rabbinate over conversions to Judaism in Israel was nixed Monday by PM Netanyahu.

Haaretz smears U.S. terrorism expert for being a Republican and friend of Sheldon Adelson.

Leslie W., 48, and his partner Akiwa H., 56, are charged with having sold more than 88,000 pounds of non-kosher meat for a marked-up price.

The Rabbinical Council of America said that since the arrest last week of Rabbi Barry Freundel of Washington, DC, it has been working assiduously to address the many challenges that its members and their communities now face.

It was an outright miracle: a tiny teahouse in the pass, and the equivalent of a Sherpa Pony Express to deliver a call for help.

ISIS propaganda video warns “our grandchildren will sell your sons as slaves.”

At least eight civilians were killed in US-led coalition air strikes against ISIS in a Syrian town near Deir el-Zour.

Hezbollah guerrillas are back on Israel’s northern border even though they’re busy in Syria. The question is what they’re planning and when.

Let’s raise funds to send her to Syria where she can put some sense in her head, if it stays attached.

An Israeli and an Arab poll results after the war.

The long ordeal of the Armenian Orphan Rug, held hostage to fears of angering Turkey, has finally ended. Or has it?

More Articles from JTA

Leslie W., 48, and his partner Akiwa H., 56, are charged with having sold more than 88,000 pounds of non-kosher meat for a marked-up price.

New York State Assemblyman Steven Cymbrowitz criticized the decision to not charge the suspect with a hate crime.

Former White House official Ron Klain has been tapped to coordinate the government’s response to the Ebola outbreak.

Even more shocking is that Jews insist on remaining in France.

Two Penn State students who pleaded guilty to spray-painting anti-Semitic graffiti on a mostly Jewish fraternity house were sentenced to community service and probation. Eric Hyland, 20, was sentenced last week in Centre County Court to 200 hours of community service and two years’ probation, and was ordered to pay $6,000 restitution. Last month, Hayden […]

A Methodist who practices Buddhism, this will be the first time he portrays a Jew.

The official exchange rate is one dollar per point.

A “wandering Sukkah” catches up with wandering Jews.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/news/would-you-eat-a-kosher-lab-grown-cheeseburger/2013/08/08/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: