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A Local, Baltimore Angle On Some Of The Hardships Of Holocaust Refugees

The Jewish Museum of Maryland's "Lives Lost" exhibit offers a meditation on a "dramatic but little known story" - according to the museum Associate Director Anita Kassof.

Jews and Social Conscience Through Photography

The Jewish Museum’s “Radical Camera” is a thrilling, beautiful exhibition that documents the development of socially conscious photography, primarily in New York City. It was a time of great challenges and great change, uptown, downtown and all around. These intensely creative, sensitive and insightful photographers all had a hand in capturing a time when New York and its people were entering the turbulent heart of the 20th century. Isn’t it interesting that the vast majority of them happened to be Jews?

Return To Sinai: Moses Und Aron By Arnold Schoenberg

I was transfixed the first time I saw Moses und Aron, the 1933 opera by Arnold Schoenberg.

The Jewish Art Enthusiast’s Guide To WNET/Channel Thirteen’s ‘Art Through Time: A Global View’

Jewish art buffs might be disappointed by channel Thirteen's new 13-part series, Art Through Time: A Global View. It takes two entire episodes (one half an hour each) and part of the third episode for a reference to Jewish art to surface. This comes in the person of Shimon Attie (born in Los Angeles, 1957), whose The Writing on the Wall (1991-3) projected pre-Holocaust photographs onto the walls of buildings in the Jewish quarter of Berlin, the Scheunenviertel. Attie's projections, which were effectively before-and-after photos of particular buildings, are particularly haunting because they reveal how much the neighborhood has changed. Another work of Attie's that is discussed in the episode is Portrait of Exile (1995), which involved submerging light boxes with portraits of Danish refugees (who fled to Sweden during the Holocaust) in a canal in Copenhagen.

Medieval Echoes: Jews, Christians & Visuality: New Approaches

A fascinating glimpse into the rich complexity of medieval Jewish life and its contemporary relevance had intriguingly emerged.

The Lisker Congregation: Determined Chassidus

Rav Shlomo Friedlander, z"l, the fourth Lisker Rav, had a vision.

The Jewish Chagall: Marc Chagall Retrospective At The San Francisco Museum Of Modern Art

In his autobiography, My Life, Marc Chagall (1887-1985) recounts a pogrom he witnessed in Russia in 1917.

The Artistic Side Of Holocaust Art

Holocaust art has dominated the news lately for all the wrong reasons.

A Simple Genesis Paintings Of Shalom Of Safed

There once lived a pious old man in Safed. His great grandparents had come from Eastern Europe to Eretz Yisrael, sometime in the 18th Century.

Bradford’s Conundrum: Paintings By John Bradford

John Bradford's exhibition of nine paintings, done in the 1990's - presents us with a conundrum.

‘Nossig’s Antics’ – A New Play By Lazarre Seymour Simckes

"Are you Alfred Nossig?" the waiter asked the middle-aged man at the table.

Geographical Silhouettes

Per Deuteronomy 21, when a corpse is found in the wilderness, an elaborate ceremony ensues that is clearly intended to disrupt the regular routines of the townspeople living nearby. The judges and elders determine which city is closest to the crime scene, and the elders of that city take a young calf, which has never been yoked, to a dismal valley, which could never sustain agricultural life, where they break the calf's neck. The Levites then arrive to observe the elders washing their hands over the bloody calf and declaring, "Our hands did not spill this blood, nor did our eyes perceive it. Therefore, God, forgive your people Israel, whom You redeemed, and do not allow innocent blood to flow amongst your nation, and let this blood atone for them."

Bird’s Head Haggadah Revealed – The Medieval Haggadah: Art, Narrative & Religious Imagination

Bird’s Head Haggadah Revealed The Medieval Haggadah: Art, Narrative & Religious Imagination By Marc Michael Epstein, Yale University Press, New Haven and London 2011

Honeybee Songs

Song of Songs is one of the most controversial books in Tanach because of its ambiguity.

Sotheby’s Tel Aviv Israeli Picture Book

Autour du Coq Rouge (Around the Red Rooster), painted in 1982 by a 95-year-old Marc Chagall (1887-1985), the most famous Jewish artist of the 20th Century, puzzles us with its mysterious loveliness and grace. The Chagall bursts upon us in a passionate torrent, scintillating our visual sensibilities with pinks, hot violets and lush greens that are only partially soothed by the flickering blues of distant skies.

The Stanton Street Shul And The Art Of David Friedman

Artists have a way of calling attention to the things we really need to see. Their sensitivity and funny way of thinking shake us up, and demand that we take notice.

Bloom’s Bittersweet Vision: Paintings by Lloyd Bloom

Upon entering Lloyd Bloom's exhibition at the Chassidic Art Institute one is confronted by the sweet beautiful image of a lamb skipping through the air in a puffy cloud landscape. Right next to it is an image of a goat kid cuddled up in the lap of a young shepherd. Further down the wall we see paintings depicting a young man leining from the Torah, then women lighting Shabbos candles and finally a father and son at the seder table, all candidates to be the most emblematic scene of Jewish life imaginable.

Edouard Vuillard, 1890-1940, at the Jewish Museum

"Edouard Vuillard: A Painter and His Muses, 1890-1940" has opened at the New York Jewish Museum and will run through September 23. The exhibition offers a fresh view of the French artist Edouard Vuillard’s career, from the vanguard 1890s to the urbane domesticity of the lesser-known late portraits.

Fighting Anti-Semitism In Life And Death: Two New Films On Daniel Pearl And Simon...

"Your powers are weak, old man," Darth Vader tells Obi-Wan Kenobi as the young Luke anxiously watches the ensuing battle from a distance.

Unraveling Jewish Threads: James Sturm’s Graphic Novel Market Day

Greek and Roman mythology envisioned the fates -- the Moirae or the Parcae -- as spinners of thread. Clotho (Nona) wove life's threads; Lachesis (Decima) measured; and Atropos (Morta) cut. To the Greeks and Romans, the cosmos was artfully woven by deities, but was also unstable and liable to fray or to unwind piece by piece. Given the Greco-Roman gods' tendencies to act like children, the pattern of life was particularly chaotic.

The Jewish Cemetery: Jacob van Ruisdael’s Homage To Religious Freedom

Not far from Amsterdam, in the village of Ouderkerk on the River Amstel, lies the Portuguese-Jewish cemetery called Beth Haim. Here in this pastoral necropolis repose the remains of Jews who fled the Iberian Peninsula in the wake of the Inquisition, exiles who chose banishment over baptism, who had fortuitously managed to survive the torture chambers or dodge the stake in the relentless drive by the Roman Catholic Church to cleanse the land of heretics.

Illustrating The Postmodernist’s Bible: Nature in John Bradford’s Art

Some painters enslave themselves to detailed landscapes, patiently tracking every tree branch and grass blade in an effort to transcribe and document everything.

Jewish Jewelry

That which sparkles and shines as it calls attention to a graceful neck or a shapely face possesses a timeless allure for all humanity.

Jewish And Non-Jewish Landscape Isaak Levitan, Thomas Cole And George Inness

He sits somewhat accusingly atop a stamp issued in Russia, remembering the 50th anniversary of his death in 1950.

Letter From Tel Aviv

A new generation of Sabra artists have come to the fore, creating imaginative and attractive pieces of arts.

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