web analytics
October 26, 2014 / 2 Heshvan, 5775
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post
Meir Panim with Soldiers 5774 Roundup: Year of Relief and Service for Israel’s Needy

Meir Panim implements programs that serve Israel’s neediest populations with respect and dignity. Meir Panim also coordinated care packages for families in the South during the Gaza War.



Home » Sections » Arts »

Exhibiting Judaica


Chanukah lamp, Russia 19th century (2)

Chanukah lamp, Russia 19th century (2)

Dear Readers,

This week we are going to resume our conversation on the various aspects of collecting Judaica.

First a note on the very early Judaica exhibitions – proof that the field is very eclectic and diverse. The first exhibition was held in 1878 at the Trocadero in Paris; on display was the now famous Strauss collection. It was a sensational event that stirred the interest of collectors and museum curators. The variety of items displayed was very educational; this was the first time one could view the glorious Chanukah menorahs made by the famous Frankfurt silversmiths in the 17th-18th centuries as well as early spice containers, Havdallah compendiums, illustrated Megillot, illuminated early Ketubot, marriage rings from the 17th century, Torah Breastplates, Torah Crowns and Parochets. What surprised viewers was the astounding craftsmanship of the items displayed and what they revealed about the culture that produced them. As I said, a sensational event for both the Jewish and non-Jewish world.

A subsequent exhibition of Judaica items was held in London in 1887. This one was much larger, presenting a few thousand objects assembled from private collections and various museums. It was after this that the Anglo Jewish Historical Society was established and later became the London Jewish Museum. A reissue of the catalogue is available online at cambridge.org.

Interestingly, the Strauss collection, which had been exhibited at the Trocadero, was later donated by Baroness Nathaniel de Rothschild to the Cluny Museum in 1890 and formed the basis for the current Paris Jewish Museum, which was established in 1986 by then Parisian mayor Jacques Chirac. Both the Cluny catalogue and the Paris Jewish Museum catalogue are available through second-hand book dealers and, of course, online.

Which brings us to today and the present Judaica collecting field. The old time collectors, the ones who began collecting when I did, collected everything from haggadot to spice boxes and even archeological Jewish objects. While you will still find people like that today, there are those who specialize in one to two specific items.

For example, collecting spice boxes is a fascinating specialty as there are so many different shapes, sizes and price ranges to choose from. The same is true of Chanukah Menorahs: from Renaissance Bronze to ones made in the 19th century, and from any part of the world where Jewish communities flourished.

Of course Synagogue ritual art is also abundant but for various reasons not usually collected.

As I write this article, two Judaica auctions are taking place: Greenstein in Cedarhurst held one on June 25th and Kestenbaum Auctions in New York on June 26th – both perfectly illustrate the ever-present opportunities for acquiring Jewish Ceremonial Art – a most rewarding endeavor.

About the Author: Romanian-born Peter Ehrenthal came to the States in 1957. He and his son have owned one of the finest Judaica galleries in the world since 1973.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Exhibiting Judaica”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Broken headstones and monuments in the Mount of Olives cemetery.
Arabs Desecrate Mount of Olives Cemetery Again
Latest Sections Stories
Nimchinsky-102414-Flag

This past summer was a powerful one for the Jewish people. I will always remember where I was on June 12th when I found out that Gilad, Eyal and Naftali were kidnapped. I will always remember the look on my sister’s face on June 30th when she told me that they were found. I will […]

Schonfeld-logo1

Avromi often put other people’s interests before his own: he would not defend people whom he believed were guilty (even if they were willing to pay him a lot of money).

Kupfer-102414

The Presbyterian Church USA voted to divest from three companies that do business with Israel.

How can I help my wife learn to say “no,” and understand that her first priority must be her husband and family?

My eyes skimmed an article on page 1A. I was flabbergasted. I read the title again. Could it be? It had good news for the Miami Jewish community.

Students in early childhood, elementary, and middle school were treated to an array of hands-on projects to create sukkah decorations such as wind chimes, velvet posters, sand art, paper chains, and more.

It is important for a therapist to focus on a person’s strengths as a way of overcoming his or her difficulties.

Sadly, there are mothers who, due to severe depression are unable or unwilling to prepare nourishing food for their children.

Michal had never been away from home. And now, she was going so far away, for so long – an entire year!

Though if you do have a schach mat, you’ll realize that it cannot actually support the weight of the water.

More Articles from Peter Ehrenthal
Silver - Persia, 19th century.

While the Torah categorically forbids the practice of magic and sorcery, the type of magic that utilizes the many mystical

Chanukah lamp, Russia 19th century (2)

Synagogue ritual art is also abundant but for various reasons not usually collected.

A new generation of Sabra artists have come to the fore, creating imaginative and attractive pieces of arts.

The highlight of the auction was a superb and extremely rare ram-shaped silver spice container (very similar to the one in the Kiev Jewish Museum, and probably by the same maker) which brought $36,000.

Collecting Jewish antiques entails a bit of dedication as well, as there are many different categories of art that we have to deal with.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/arts/exhibiting-judaica/2014/07/04/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: