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It’s a Thin Line: The Eruv and Jewish Community in New York and Beyond


Manhattan Three Times (2007 – 2011), acrylic & thread on paper by Ben Schachter
Courtesy Yeshiva University Museum

Manhattan Three Times (2007 – 2011), acrylic & thread on paper by Ben Schachter Courtesy Yeshiva University Museum

Yeshiva University Museum – Center for Jewish History
15 West 16th Street, NYC; 212-294 8330
www.yumuseum.org
Until June 30, 2013

Jewish law prohibits carrying an object from a private domain to a public domain (or vice versa) or within a public domain on the Sabbath. One who intentionally carries, knowing the prohibition on the Sabbath is libel to the death penalty by a Jewish court. The creation of an eruv establishes, where possible, an extended private domain in which such carrying is permissible.

Extruded (an eruv project) Timeline and Map of Manhattan Eruvs from 1907 – 2012;
Nylon upholstery thread, jewelry hardware by R. Justin Stewart
Courtesy Yeshiva University Museum

What a wonderful exhibition Yeshiva University Museum has mounted. Sensitively curated by Zachary Paul Levine under the watchful and expert halachic supervision of Rabbi Adam Mintz (see his “The Brooklyn Eruv” in the Winter 2012 Hakirah Journal), the show traces the origins and development of the rabbinic construct known as the eruv based on the Oral Law. A topic first found in the Mishna and then elaborated in its own tractate in Gemara, the show follows its historic development with fascinating historic texts, urban maps, illustrated guidelines and over 130 artifacts spanning 500 years.

The show initially examines European eruvim, and then quickly narrows its focus to America. The St. Louis Jewish community created the first American urban eruv in 1896 utilizing the town’s ubiquitous telegraph wires and poles along the banks of the Mississippi River. Interestingly, one of the main impetuses to establishing an eruv in St. Louis was the attempt to remove the sin of public Shabbos desecration by the non-observant Jewish population. This would become a major factor in the creation of all urban eruvim.

The multiple iterations of the Manhattan Eruv is the focus of more than half of the exhibition and the depiction of how the story unfolds is truly fascinating. What is striking is the rabbinic concern for Manhattan’s Jews, especially as New York quickly became the gateway and home to much of America’s Jewish population. Again the rabbinic scrutiny and action was because many of these Jews were non-observant. In 1905 Rabbi Yehoshua Seigel established the first Manhattan urban eruv, encompassing the entire East Side and utilizing the banks of the East River and the Third Avenue El. The controversy that followed lays the foundation for the next halachic battleground. Uptown migrations of Jews, halachic concerns and the demolition of the Third Avenue El beginning in 1950 led to attempts to create an all-inclusive Manhattan eruv. In 1950 Rabbi Menachem Zvi Eisenstadt first proposed an eruv around the island of Manhattan based on the existing sea walls. This was finally established in 1962 in the face of fundamental opposition expressed in a 1952 teshuvah by Rabbi Moshe Feinstein. The exhibition follows the controversy as it becomes considerably more complex on both sides. It is at this juncture in the narrative that contemporary Jewish Art is introduced into the exhibition.

R. Justin Stewart’s “extruded” (an eruv project) 2012 is a hanging sculpture that reflects the Manhattan eruv controversy as a three dimensional graphic. Multiple blue and white rayon upholstery threads descend from the ceiling, stopping at discrete levels to graphically depict the historically distinct Manhattan eruvim. At first it seems like a bunch of vertical lines, then the various outlines of the eruvim floating above one another emerge to create a symphony of halachic encounters. Each level represents one historical understanding of halachic repair and permission. It is thrilling to see modern rabbinics as three-dimensional art.

Elliot Malkin’s “The Laser Eruv,” first seen by this reviewer in “Shaping Community: Poetics and Politics of the Eruv,” curated by Margaret Olin this Fall at Yale University is featured in an indoor version. Malkin’s work has, in its way, managed to make an ephemeral Jewish concept even more so. The possibility of the laser as an eruv “wire” is still tantalizing.

The fundamentals of eruv are outlined literally by artist Ben Schachter. First he has created an “eruv” around the two level installation by mapping wires around the multiple and complex exhibition walls. The lines linearly depict the surrounding Manhattan cityscape as well as the specific physical outline of the Center for Jewish History, the site of the exhibition. Schachter has 5 other artworks in the exhibition, most of which compress actual eruvim into artwork maps depicting their outlines, here comprised of string surrounding painted enclosures. His works make the expansive concept tangible and physically graspable.

About the Author: Richard McBee is a painter and writer on Jewish Art. Contact him at rmcbee@nyc.rr.com


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