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April 21, 2015 / 2 Iyar, 5775
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John Logan Approximates Mark Rothko

Wecker-Menachem

There have been many artists since Rothko, and some deserve attention and adoration more than others. However, Rothko advocated respect for and study of his predecessors’ works, and one might object that some of the more recent movements and generations haven’t maintained that respect for tradition. Regardless, one might have hoped that “Red” would celebrate Rothko’s life and art, which probably isn’t appreciated enough today.

One can go to just about any museum and gallery and hear about all the achievements of artists that have succeeded Rothko. This would have been an opportunity to shift the scales back a bit, and recast the conversation about and reputation of a very special artist who deserves a bit more time in the spotlight.

Menachem Wecker, who blogs on faith and art for the Houston Chronicle at http://blog.chron.com/iconia, welcomes comments at mwecker@gmail.com.

About the Author: Menachem Wecker, who blogs on faith and art for the Houston Chronicle at http://blogs.chron.com/iconia, welcomes comments at mwecker@gmail.com.


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