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May 30, 2015 / 12 Sivan, 5775
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Rabbi Riskin on Tension with the Chief Rabbinate, and Rabbi Feuer on the Priestly Blessing
 
Israel Welcomes End to FIFA’s ‘Absurd Situation’

May 30, 2015 - 1:50 AM
 
FIFA President Sepp Blatter Re-Elected Despite Corruption Scandals, Arrests

May 29, 2015 - 11:56 PM
 
No Goal – Rajoub Drops FIFA Sportsfare Attack on Israel

May 29, 2015 - 5:38 PM
 
Bomb Threat Clears Out FIFA Congress (for Lunch)

May 29, 2015 - 3:36 PM
 
Israel Rejects as ‘False’ UJA Federation’s Claims about Israel Parade ‘Inclusion’

May 29, 2015 - 2:58 PM
 
Pro-Palestinian Protesters Invade FIFA Congress

May 29, 2015 - 12:57 PM
 
Religious Mailmen Complain They Have to Deliver Missionary Propaganda

May 29, 2015 - 11:46 AM
 
Final Steps Underway for Jerusalem’s City of David Visitor’s Center

May 29, 2015 - 10:30 AM
 
Jewish Organizations Raise Relief Funds after Houston Flood

May 29, 2015 - 10:12 AM
 
Mass. Gov. Baker Declares Sunday ‘Celebrate Israel Day’

May 29, 2015 - 9:39 AM
 
‘Mystery Rabbi’ Sues Rapper ‘Ice Cube’ for $2 Million for Assault

May 29, 2015 - 9:31 AM
 
Israel Envisions Regional Cooperation with Arab Nations

May 29, 2015 - 3:04 AM
 
El Paso, Texas and Hadera, Israel Become Sister Cities

May 29, 2015 - 3:00 AM
 
Jerusalem Post Editor Attacked by Arabs at ‘Coexistence’ ‘Hug’ Day

May 29, 2015 - 2:54 AM
 
At Least 10 Killed in Baghdad Hotel Bombings [video]

May 29, 2015 - 1:41 AM
 
Israel Railways Workers Set to Strike

May 29, 2015 - 1:25 AM
 
Another Iranian General Killed in Syria

May 29, 2015 - 1:16 AM
 
Hezbollah Runs Away as Jabhat al-Nusra Captures Another Syrian City

May 29, 2015 - 12:39 AM
 
Jerusalem Yeshiva Student Drowns in Beit Zayit Reservoir

May 28, 2015 - 10:08 PM
 
Netanyahu Warns FIFA: Palestinian Threats Will Destroy International Sport

May 28, 2015 - 9:45 PM
 
Medical Update on Rav Bina’s Grandson [video]

May 28, 2015 - 7:47 PM
 
IRS $50M Cyber Security Scandal Stretches to Russia

May 28, 2015 - 6:36 PM
 
Tony Blair Steps Down as Quartet Middle East Envoy but No One Cares

May 28, 2015 - 4:58 PM
 
Police Detain 2 Muslims for Harassing Visitors on the Temple Mount

May 28, 2015 - 4:27 PM
 
Former NY Gov. Pataki Running for GOP Presidential Nominee

May 28, 2015 - 3:49 PM
 
One of Indicted FIFA Officials Blamed ‘Zionism’ for 2011 Bribe Charge

May 28, 2015 - 1:59 PM
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Celebrate Israel Festival 600x400 Leading Israeli Athletes, Artists, and Innovators Join Celebrate Israel Festival

The Celebrate Israel Festival on May 31 at Pier 94, slated to be the largest gathering to date of Israeli-Americans in New York.



Arts
 

Posted on: December 22nd, 2010

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Beneath Baruch Spinoza's smiling bust on his tombstone on the grounds of the Nieuwe Kerk in the Hague is an inscription of his famous motto, "caute" (written cavte on the stone, see image one), or "cautiously" in Latin. Between that admonition and the dates of his life - 1632 to 1677, cut short by an illness whose identity is hotly debated - is the Hebrew word "amcha" or "amach", Hebrew for "your people" or "your nation."

 

Posted on: December 8th, 2010

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There is something profound and soothing in the ancient Jewish practice of using the euphemism beit chaim, "house of life," to refer to a cemetery. It is as if the rabbis did not even want to coin the phrase beit mavet, "house of death," for fear of inviting the evil eye.

 

Posted on: November 17th, 2010

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"By breaking statues one risks turning into one oneself," says a caption in Jean Cocteau's 1930 film, "The Blood of a Poet." The statement could be a postmodern take on Psalm 115, which declares that those who make idols (which have mouths but cannot speak, eyes but cannot see, ears but cannot hear, noses but cannot smell, hands but cannot feel and feet but cannot walk), "shall become like them, all that place their faith in them."

 

Posted on: November 11th, 2010

SectionsArts

In many ways, it should be a no-brainer for readers of The Jewish Press to make the decision to visit the latest Jewish Art Salon exhibit, Seduced by the Sacred, or, if the trek to Hartford is prohibitive, to immerse themselves in the works online. After all, most readers of this publication are surely already seduced by the sacred - however problematic the definition of both terms may be - and, particularly if they are regular readers of this column, they will be intrigued by the question of new Jewish art.

 

Posted on: November 3rd, 2010

SectionsArts

The world is complicated. Surely it seems that Divine justice is elusive. God's role is frequently masked and our human situation is terribly fragile. Yet according to artist Batya F. Kuncman our condition is "most promising." Her optimistic artwork is designed to illuminate this shadowy nature of our existence and strives for clarity and ultimate closeness to God. In "Landscapes for Humanity," currently at the Philadelphia Museum of Jewish Art, images of infants are the tools she uses to explicate her belief.

 

Posted on: October 27th, 2010

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Jewish art buffs might be disappointed by channel Thirteen's new 13-part series, Art Through Time: A Global View. It takes two entire episodes (one half an hour each) and part of the third episode for a reference to Jewish art to surface. This comes in the person of Shimon Attie (born in Los Angeles, 1957), whose The Writing on the Wall (1991-3) projected pre-Holocaust photographs onto the walls of buildings in the Jewish quarter of Berlin, the Scheunenviertel. Attie's projections, which were effectively before-and-after photos of particular buildings, are particularly haunting because they reveal how much the neighborhood has changed. Another work of Attie's that is discussed in the episode is Portrait of Exile (1995), which involved submerging light boxes with portraits of Danish refugees (who fled to Sweden during the Holocaust) in a canal in Copenhagen.

 

Posted on: October 27th, 2010

SectionsArts

Jewish art buffs might be disappointed by channel Thirteen's new 13-part series, Art Through Time: A Global View. It takes two entire episodes (one half an hour each) and part of the third episode for a reference to Jewish art to surface. This comes in the person of Shimon Attie (born in Los Angeles, 1957), whose The Writing on the Wall (1991-3) projected pre-Holocaust photographs onto the walls of buildings in the Jewish quarter of Berlin, the Scheunenviertel. Attie's projections, which were effectively before-and-after photos of particular buildings, are particularly haunting because they reveal how much the neighborhood has changed. Another work of Attie's that is discussed in the episode is Portrait of Exile (1995), which involved submerging light boxes with portraits of Danish refugees (who fled to Sweden during the Holocaust) in a canal in Copenhagen.

 

Posted on: October 13th, 2010

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In Italo Calvino's short story "The Adventure of a Photographer," part of his collection Difficult Loves (1985), the "non-photographer" and bachelor Antonino Paraggi, finds himself increasingly alienated from his married friends who go out with their families and cameras each Sunday and "come back as happy as hunters with bulging game bags," their photographic catch of the day.

 

Posted on: October 13th, 2010

SectionsArts

In Italo Calvino's short story "The Adventure of a Photographer," part of his collection Difficult Loves (1985), the "non-photographer" and bachelor Antonino Paraggi, finds himself increasingly alienated from his married friends who go out with their families and cameras each Sunday and "come back as happy as hunters with bulging game bags," their photographic catch of the day.

 

Posted on: September 28th, 2010

SectionsArts

out half a year ago, my friend Miriam asked if I knew of any artists or architects whose repertoires included sukkahs. My thoughts immediately turned to the gorgeous sukkah my grandfather designed and built every year and to the retractable roof in the dining room at the Bostoner Rebbe's synagogue, Congregation Beth Pinchas. But for the life of me, I couldn't think of any artist who had developed an interesting aesthetic approach to the sukkah, which is the only Jewish experience (save mikvah perhaps) that completely surrounds us.

 

Posted on: September 28th, 2010

SectionsArts

out half a year ago, my friend Miriam asked if I knew of any artists or architects whose repertoires included sukkahs. My thoughts immediately turned to the gorgeous sukkah my grandfather designed and built every year and to the retractable roof in the dining room at the Bostoner Rebbe's synagogue, Congregation Beth Pinchas. But for the life of me, I couldn't think of any artist who had developed an interesting aesthetic approach to the sukkah, which is the only Jewish experience (save mikvah perhaps) that completely surrounds us.

 

Posted on: September 21st, 2010

SectionsArts

God commands Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac, Sarah's only child. Our forefather gets up early and obeys, not telling Sarah, his wife of 47 years. According to Rashi (Genesis 23:2) when she finds out that Abraham had taken Isaac as a sacrifice and then had not killed him, the shock is too much for her and she dies. This has always disturbed me. Upon reflection other things about their relationship seemed problematic.

 

Posted on: September 7th, 2010

SectionsArts

Mark Podwal is a busy, busy man. He has spent the last 38 years making every conceivable kind of art: innumerable paintings, 28 illustrated books written by him and Elie Wiesel, Harold Bloom and Francine Prose, children's books, haggadot, ceramics and graphic works. Dubbed the "Master of the True Line" by author Cynthia Ozick, his pro-Israel cartoons and drawings have been featured on the Op-Ed pages of the New York Times since 1972.

 

Posted on: September 1st, 2010

SectionsArts

New York has gone through a William Kentridge craze this year. There have been scattered exhibitions in galleries throughout the cities, in addition to lectures and live performances. From the blockbuster Five Themes show at the MoMA, the Metropolitan Opera's production of Kentridge's directed-and-designed multimedia version of Shostakovich's The Nose, the South African artist has been a dominant voice on the New York art scene. For those who missed the incredible MoMA retrospective-or for those who simply wish for another Kentridge fix-a final salvo can be caught at the Jewish Museum's exhibition of part of Kentridge's Nine Drawings for Projection series.

 

Posted on: August 25th, 2010

SectionsArts

A tallit with pastel-colored circular candies on the atarah (literally crown, the top, embellished portion of the garment); a hand held golden bulldozer used to collect chametz on Passover; a mezuzah that shows the three letter name of God (shin, daled, yud, the Sustainer) on a computer keyboard above an "Enter" button, where the text of the mezuzah appears (in the typography of a Torah scroll) on the monitor.

 

Posted on: August 25th, 2010

SectionsArts

A tallit with pastel-colored circular candies on the atarah (literally crown, the top, embellished portion of the garment); a hand held golden bulldozer used to collect chametz on Passover; a mezuzah that shows the three letter name of God (shin, daled, yud, the Sustainer) on a computer keyboard above an "Enter" button, where the text of the mezuzah appears (in the typography of a Torah scroll) on the monitor.

The Tenth Man – oil on canvas (6.5’ x 10’) by Brian Shapiro
Courtesy the artist
 

Posted on: August 19th, 2010

SectionsArts

Two Jewish holidays particularly command us to be connected with our vast history. Most notably Passover demands that we feel as if we too went out of Egypt with the Jewish masses. Less obvious is Tisha b’Av.

 

Posted on: August 11th, 2010

SectionsArts

As I sit to write this article less than a week before my wedding, my mind keeps returning to a particular work, which one must grapple with if one intends to take the history of Jewish art seriously.

 

Posted on: August 11th, 2010

SectionsArts

As I sit to write this article less than a week before my wedding, my mind keeps returning to a particular work, which one must grapple with if one intends to take the history of Jewish art seriously.

 

Posted on: August 4th, 2010

SectionsArts

Imagine you are a mohel and, thank God, business is booming. It's a good living and you even have time to sit and learn in between the jobs that seem to crop up at least once a week. In addition, you do a bit of doctoring and tutoring a few children in heder. You think, "Perhaps I should have a siddur to replace my father's worn-out printed volume that he got from his father and then from his father oh so many years ago. Here I am in Trebitsch who can help me find something...nice. Oh, I know, Aryeh ben Judah Leib. He is getting really famous for making hand written books with beautiful decorations over in Vienna where he has set up shop. He makes his seforim for important people, even those Yidden who serve at the royal Court - just like they used to do maybe two hundred years ago before we had Hebrew printing. Why not, I'm doing well, doing God's work. It's a hiddur mitzvah."

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