web analytics
January 26, 2015 / 6 Shevat, 5775
 
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post


A Pioneer Of Holocaust Commemoration

Not to Forget: The Story of Harry Reiss and the Creation of the Rockland Center for Holocaust Studies
By Marion Reiss

 

Lma’an yaidu dorotaichem – so that your generations may know” (Lev. 23:43) – the Torah commands that future generations be aware of what transpired to their ancestors. There are numerous mitzvot whose purpose is to remind the performer about the Exodus from Egypt, the slavery conditions the Jews endured, and the miraculous manner of the redemption. It is not only national events; the prohibition of eating the sciatic nerve is a reminder of Yaakov’s epic battle with the mysterious night creature. These are examples of mandated remembrances, but there is also a call for individual expression. In Moshe’s final song of Ha’azinu he instructs the people: “She’al avicha v’yagedcha, zkanecha v’yomru loch – ask your father, he will tell you, your elders, they will relate it to you” (Deut. 32:7). Each person is to ask his elders about their story, and the elders should in turn relate it. This task is not always easy and in some generations it is of excruciating difficulty; yet it remains of paramount importance. In 1945 an indescribable and unparalleled Jewish tragedy ended and the task of rebuilding commenced. At the time, the idea of remembering and commemorating was far from most people’s minds.

Harry Reiss was born in the U.S. to parents who were not survivors, but he understood that it was essential to educate future generations about the horrors and tales of survival of the holocaust. In the first year in which Harry was involved in Holocaust education in the 1970′s, one survivor typically told him that (page 4): “Remembrance of the past is difficult if you are a survivor of a Nazi concentration camp. Because we don’t want to live in the past, we have not given it to our children. We don’t want to live it again. It’s the only way to survive.” Another survivor told him that she had never told her own son, who was then 17 years old, of her experiences in the Holocaust.

For many, many years holocaust commemoration was not on the agenda. Many individual survivors could not or did not want to talk about it. The Jewish community was preoccupied with reestablishing itself, building schools and establishing a Jewish state in the Land of Israel. Even Elie Wiesel did not immediately express his feelings and thoughts. For ten years after the war he refused to write about or discuss his wartime experiences. Once he started writing a torrent emerged and Wiesel produced a 900-page Yiddish memoir that was eventually shortened to his now famous book Night. But the world was not ready and he initially had trouble finding a publisher. Finally, in 1960, the English version debuted, but it barely sold 1,000 copies in the first 18 months.

To be fair, there were rare exceptions. Remarkably, the seeds for Yad Vashem were already planted in the middle of the war; in 1942, and in 1946, Yad Vashem established its offices. In 1953, the Knesset passed the Yad Vashem Law and in 1957 Yad Vashem opened. So too Beit Lohamei Haghetaot – The Ghetto Fighters’ House Museum became the first Holocaust museum founded by survivors when it was established in 1949. But those were the exception. And outside of Israel things moved much slower.

In the U.S. 30 years were to pass before national level commemorations would become commonplace. The 1978 NBC miniseries “Holocaust” was a watershed event. In that same year, President Carter established the President’s Commission on the Holocaust which a year later recommended the establishment of a national Holocaust memorial museum in Washington, D.C. Ten years later President Reagan layed the cornerstone and the building finally opened to the public in 1993, almost 50 years after the end of WWII.

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “A Pioneer Of Holocaust Commemoration”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Amazon drone delivers to the door..
Drone Found on White House Lawn
Latest Sections Stories
Dr. Esther Rose Lowy

Dr. Lowy believed passionately in higher education for both men and women and would stop at nothing to assist young students in achieving their educational goals.

book-Lincoln

It’s almost pointless to try to summarize all of the fascinating information that Holzer’s research unearthed.

The special charm of these letters is their immediacy and authenticity of emotion and description.

Why is there such a steep learning curve for teachers? And what can we, as educators and community activists, do better in the educational system and keep first-year teachers in the job?

Teachers, as well as administrators, must be actively involved in the daily prayers that transpire at a school and must set the bar as dugmaot ishiot, role models, on how one must daven.

Often both girls and boys compare their date to their parents.

We love the food, the hotels, and even the wildlife. We love the Israelis.

Few traces remain of the glory days of Jewish life in the kingdoms of Sicily and Naples, but the demise wasn’t due to the eruption of nearby Mount Vesuvius. Rather it was a manmade volcano called the Edict of Expulsion from Spain – and not even an invitation to return in Shevat of 1740 could […]

Garbage in your streets, my city
Wind-blown litter, lonely men

I love you in your blazing heat
my aching feet
dragging in your streets.

These monsters constantly attack
When we dare to try to fight back

With so many new cases of ADHD reported each year, it is important to help children learn how to sit still.

More Articles from Ari Z. Zivotofsky

In this book, lovingly and admiringly written by Harry’s wife Marion, his partner in all his endeavors, the reader is granted a ringside seat to every detail in how this project was conceived and carried to fruition.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/books/book-reviews/a-pioneer-of-holocaust-commemoration/2014/07/03/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: