web analytics
April 18, 2014 / 18 Nisan, 5774
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post
Spa 1.2 Combining Modern Living in Traditional Jerusalem

A unique and prestigious residential project in now being built in Mekor Haim Street in Jerusalem.



All Of His Wonders

Winter-112213-Intergalactic

Share Button

Intergalactic Judaism: An Analysis of Torah Concepts Based on Discoveries in Space Exploration, Physics and Biology; By Rabbi David Lister; Urim Publications

Editor’s Note: The following is adapted from the foreword to Intergalactic Judaism with permission from the author.

A while back I inducted a new rabbi into office. It’s something I do often, and there is a certain predictability to the proceedings. I give the new rabbi my blessings and encouragement. He in reply thanks those who have helped him through the years, and sets out his aspirations as a spiritual leader and his vision for the future of the congregation. Imagine, therefore, my surprise when this particular rabbi took as the centerpiece of his address a poem entitled “Ode to a Harley Davidson” (a classic motorbike, for the uninitiated). It was unexpected, eccentric, and wholly effective. It perfectly fitted his theme – as unusual as the poem itself – which was that Judaism is about celebrating the present moment, the epiphanies of everyday life.

By now you will have guessed that the rabbi was David Lister, the author of this book. He is a man of rare spirituality and deep humanity, with a radiant smile that seems to come all the way from heaven itself. This is an unusual person, and appropriately he has written an unusual book. The title itself, Intergalactic Judaism, is enough to make you want to open it immediately and start reading. Once you have started, you are unlikely to stop. I’m not sure that I’ve read anything like it before.

Here is a work that combines dazzling erudition in astronomy, theoretical physics and various other scientific disciplines, together with a fine knowledge of Jewish mysticism and biblical commentary, and – what is truly rare – an ability to combine them seamlessly into a view of the world that is both spiritual and humane. What Rabbi Lister has, and generously shares with us, is a capacity for wonder: at the majesty of creation and therefore of the Creator. Here, with examples drawn from interstellar space to lightning, earthquakes and the humble lichen, is one man’s testimony to the miracles with which we are daily surrounded and which, if only we would open our eyes, testify to the awesome splendor of the universe. This is a surprising book and a moving one, and no reader will come away without having learned not only facts of which he or she was previously unaware, but also a new reverence in the face of existence itself, a sense of privilege at being alive. “Lift your eyes and look to the heavens,” said Isaiah, “and see who created all these.” Rabbi Lister has written, in effect, an extended commentary to that verse.

In his halachic code, the Mishneh Torah, Maimonides wrote that the natural sciences, along with metaphysics, are the paths to the love and awe of God. Understanding the complexity of the universe, he believed, we could not but feel the greatness of God, the smallness of mankind, and the strange and striking grace by which we are able to communicate with heaven because God has communicated with us. That is a set of ideas that suffered an eclipse with the mechanistic view of the universe that grew with the Enlightenment, and the “blind watchmaker” of neo-Darwinism. The time is right for us to reconsider and rehabilitate the Maimonidean perspective because so much of modern science – from cosmology to the mapping of the human genome – has revealed a world far more complex and finely tuned for the emergence of life than had hitherto been suspected. Rabbi Lister’s book, though not on this theme, is part of that process. Rightly he sees religious faith and science not as enemies but as potential friends.

The great nineteenth-century mystic, Rabbi Zadok hakohen of Lublin, once said that in the beginning, God wrote a book. He called it the universe. Then he wrote a commentary to this book and called it the Torah. That, he added, is why there are new insights (chiddushim) into Torah every day. We say in our prayers that God, every day, renews the work of creation. And if the universe is new every day, then Torah – God’s commentary to the universe – must also be new every day. To that lovely thought this book is testimony. It is full of new ideas, or rather ancient and classic ideas in a new context, and just as a diamond sparkles with new radiance when placed in a new setting, so do the words of Torah when reset by a jeweler, which is what our author is. Thank you, Rabbi Lister, for an unusual and delightful book which, by making us see the universe in a new light, will help us be a little different in future, more attuned to the wonders of creation, more open to the divine music of life.

Share Button

About the Author: Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks, former chief rabbi of the British Commonwealth, is the author of many books of Jewish thought, most recently The Great Partnership: Science, Religion, and the Search for Meaning.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

Leave a comment (Select your commenting platform)

One Response to “All Of His Wonders”

  1. The question is are we really listening to and obeying God as He has commanded us to. Read an interesting ebook on lulu.com "The Big Lie" by Michael Cohen

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Loading Facebook Comments ...
Loading Disqus Comments ...
Current Top Story
FBI Wanted poster for Osama bin Laden
Pakistan Library Renamed to Honor bin Laden
Latest Sections Stories
Schonfeld-logo1

Regardless of age, parents play an important role in their children’s lives.

Marriage-Relationship-logo

We peel away one layer after the next, our eyes tear up and it becomes harder and harder to see as we get closer to our innermost insecurities and fears.

Gorsky-041814-Torah

Some Mountain Jews believe they are descendents of the Ten Lost Tribes and were exiled to Azerbaijan and Dagestan by Sancheriv.

Baim-041814-Piggy

Yom Tov is about spending time with your family. And while for some families the big once-in-a-lifetime experience is great, for others something low key is the way to go.

A fascinating glimpse into the rich complexity of medieval Jewish life and its contemporary relevance had intriguingly emerged.

Dear Dr. Yael:

My heart is breaking; my husband’s friend has gotten divorced. While this type of situation is always sad, here I do believe it could have been avoided.

The plan’s goal is to provide supportive housing to 200 individuals with disabilities by the year 2020.

Despite being one of the fastest-growing Jewish communities in the U.S. – the estimated Jewish population is 70-80,000 – Las Vegas has long been overlooked by much of the Torah world.

She was followed by the shadows of the Six Million, by the ever so subtle awareness of their vanished presence.

Pesach is so liberating (if you excuse the expression). It’s the only time I can eat anywhere in the house, guilt free! Matzah in bed!

Now all the pain, fear and struggle were over and they were home. Yuli was safe and free, a hero returned to his land and people.

While it would seem from his question that he is being chuzpadik and dismissive, I wonder if its possible, if just maybe, he is a struggling, confused neshama who actually wants to come back to the fold.

I agree with the letter writer that a shadchan should respectfully and graciously accept a negative response to a shidduch offer.

Alternative assessments are an extremely important part of understanding what students know beyond the scope of tests and quizzes.

More Articles from Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks
Rabbi Sacks

In Judaism, to be without questions is a sign not of faith, but of lack of depth.

Rabbi Sacks

You perpetuate a transformative event by turning it into a ritual.

There is much in this episode that is hard to understand, much that has to do with the concept of holiness and the powerful energies it released that, like nuclear power today, could be deadly dangerous if not properly used. But there is also a more human story about two approaches to leadership that still resonates with us today.

Nasi is the generic word for a leader: a ruler, king, judge, elder, or prince. Usually it refers to the holder of political power.

The account of the construction of the Tabernacle in Vayakhel-Pekudei is built around the number seven.

Vayakhel is Moses’ response to the wild abandon of the crowd that gathered around Aaron and made the golden calf.

Sometimes, despite your best efforts, you fail. Such is life.

In Judaism, monarchy had little or no religious function.

    Latest Poll

    Now that Kerry's "Peace Talks" are apparently over, are you...?







    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/books/book-reviews/all-of-his-wonders/2013/11/21/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: