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December 21, 2014 / 29 Kislev, 5775
 
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Seeing The Kings, Anew

book-I-Kings

I Kings: Torn in Two
By Alex Israel
Published by Koren Publishers, Magid Books/Yeshivat Har Etzion

 

The Jewish people have been known for over a thousand years as “the People of the Book.” Despite the pejorative intentions of those who first coined the phrase, Jews have adopted it wholeheartedly, reveling in their reputation as a learned people, a nation whose identity and destiny are intertwined with the “book of books,” the Tanach.

However, in spectacular irony, the Jews, especially those most orthodox and most educated, are often surprisingly ignorant of the Bible. Sections of the Tanach that were not included in the liturgy came to be regarded as obscure. As Professor Nechama Leibowitz, the late great teacher par excellence of Bible often remarked, men who study in classical yeshivas know only the verses cited in the Talmud, and are able to locate them only insofar as they are cross-referenced on the Talmud folio.

And therein lies the rub; the Talmud has become such an all-encompassing repository of Jewish knowledge and scholarship that all other books have been eclipsed by the Talmud’s huge shadow.

The return to the Land of Israel in the modern age brought with it a renaissance of Bible study. For the early pioneers and founders of the State of Israel, the study of Tanach was a means of reconnecting the nation with its homeland and heritage, and they revitalized Tanach studies in Israel’s nascent education system. More recently, the torch of Bible study has been carried primarily by the National Religious stream; the Tanach curriculum in non-religious public schools has been cut back drastically, and the more traditional streams have preferred to maintain the Talmud-based system – perhaps because they fear the nationalist and even Zionist messages contained within the Bible.

The return to the Biblical text has given rise to a cadre of dedicated teachers who have brought their own intelligence and creativity, as well as the wealth of tradition, to the study of Tanach, while expanding the walls of the classroom to include the length and breadth of the Land of Israel. Rabbi Alex Israel has firmly established himself as one of the more important teachers of this school of thought, particularly for English-speaking students.

His first published volume is a guide to the Book of Kings, and it is neither a classic academic inquiry nor a commentary. I Kings: Torn in Two combines a traditional reading of the text and the classical commentaries with a smattering of academic insights and relevant archaeological findings. A broad introduction addresses larger issues that lie beyond the text, including the general perspective and concerns of the author of the Book of Kings, as well as the different perspectives of the events as they are retold in other books of the Tanach. Israel’s work displays great sensitivity to the words of the Biblical text and great attentiveness to its underlying concepts.

Adopting an ancient exegetical approach that is based on midrashic readings of the text, thematic connections that span between various books of the Bible are revealed. Israel is creative and knows when to look at symbols and when to read things literally, both in the Biblical text and the midrashic material.

In this volume, Rabbi Israel attempts, once again, to expand the limits of the classroom – demographically, not geographically. This book undertakes the challenging task of converting lectures given in the classroom into a vehicle to reach a larger audience. Often the author seems to make a conscious decision to present multiple theories – which certainly will help many readers who would have seen the text monochromatically. The reader is engaged, and is never left with the sense of hearing only one side of a conversation. On the other hand, when more than one solution to a textual problem is offered, the reader is left to wonder which resolution the author advocates, or to create a synthesis on their own.

About the Author: Rabbi Ari Kahn, director of foreign students programs at Bar Ilan University, is a teacher, communal rabbi, and author. His most recent book in the Echoes of Eden series is “Bamidbar: Spies, Subversives and other Scoundrels.”


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Adopting an ancient exegetical approach that is based on midrashic readings of the text, thematic connections that span between various books of the Bible are revealed.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/books/book-reviews/seeing-the-kings-anew/2014/07/21/

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