web analytics
December 27, 2014 / 5 Tevet, 5775
 
At a Glance
In Print
Sponsored Post
8000 meals Celebrate Eight Days of Chanukah – With 8,000 Free Meals Daily to Israel’s Poor

Join Meir Panim’s campaign to “light up” Chanukah for families in need.



It’s My Opinion: Land For Peace And Other Thanksgiving Myths


It’s that time of year again. Turkey, sweet potato casserole and a harsh lesson in the reality of “land for peace” deals…

America will be celebrating Thanksgiving on Thursday, November 24. Tremendous effort has always been focused on portraying this time in a lovely, romanticized light. The reality, however, is quite grim.

The Indians, or Native Americans, were the original “land for peace” advocates. They believed a nation has to negotiate “with its enemies and not with its friends.” They wanted to “give peace a chance.”

The Native Americans gave away their land for worthless treaties. They did not want to be viewed as “intransigent.” For the most part, they acquiesced. They thought two nations could share one land.

There were some who took the white man’s desire for their land as a declaration of war.  These tribes fought fiercely to protect their domain. Perhaps they were viewed as misguided right-wing zealots.

The “peace now” contingent believed they could give the interlopers their own state within America’s borders and they would be satisfied. They thought wrong.

Their “peace partners” wanted it all. Their “road map” was called Manifest Destiny. The once proud Indian nation was crushed. They are now an insignificant minority in what once was their homeland. Theirs is a downtrodden culture with a high incidence of alcoholism and other social maladies. For the most part, they live in ghetto-like areas called reservations. The recent acquisition of Indian reservation casinos is a poor exchange for the pride of a viable nation.

We are taught, “Who is wise? He who learns from everyone.” Israel could learn a lesson from the Native Americans, who gave “land for peace” and lived to regret it.

Israel continues making unilateral concessions and handovers. So did the Indians.  Hopefully, the Jews will wake up before they wind up living in a small ghetto in Tel Aviv with a casino in Bnai Brak.

About the Author: Shelley Benveniste is South Florida editor of The Jewish Press.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “It’s My Opinion: Land For Peace And Other Thanksgiving Myths”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
Ayala Shapira, 11, is fighting for her life after suffering burn wounds when an Arab terrorist threw a Molotov cocktail at the car in which she was riding.
‘Slight Improvement’ in Life-threatening Condition of Firebomb Victim
More Articles from Shelley Benveniste
South-Florida-logo

The incident was completely unforeseeable. The only term to describe the set of circumstances surrounding it is “freak occurrence.”

The NHS was also honored to have Bob Diener as keynote speaker.

Rav Dynovisz will be speaking in Hebrew on Wednesday, January 7, at 7:30 p.m.

Rabbi Simeon Schreiber, senior chaplain at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach, saw a small room in the hospital that was dark and dismal but could be used for Sabbath guests.

The menorah tree was originally intended as a gift to Michael’s wife, but it has taken off and is being sold around the country.

Weekly visits open an entire new world of social connection and interaction for a senior.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/community/south-florida/its-my-opinion-land-for-peace-and-other-thanksgiving-myths-2/2011/11/16/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: