web analytics
July 13, 2014 / 15 Tammuz, 5774
Israel at War: Operation Protective Edge
 
 
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post
Meir Panim's Restaurant in Tiberias Restaurant in Tiberias Enriches Holocaust Survivors’ Wellbeing

The generosity of Mrs. Lee Steinberg of New York helped establish the Meir Panim Free Restaurant in Tiberias.



Chronicles Of Crises In Our Communities – 11/11/10

By:

Chronicles-logo

Dear Rachel,

I read with interest your article on disciplining children. (“Hitting is for cowards” – Chronicles 10-15) The debate – “spare the rod and spoil the child” – is an old one and a tough one.

I recall with clarity when my father took me to cheder as a little boy and in front of the whole class informed the rebbe that he can hit me whenever he felt the need to. As young as I was, I was mortified and embarrassed, and I fully believe that the seed of my rebellion was planted at that precise moment.

It took many years for me to reconcile myself to my father’s ways – to understand that he emulated his own father’s ways and that was the only method of discipline he grew up with and was familiar with. My father was in general a mild-mannered man, but he was woefully short on words; verbal communication was not his thing.

Today, as a father myself, I do understand the difficulties in rearing rambunctious children, especially boys, but I steer clear of the strap and the slap. If verbal reasoning doesn’t do it, I resort to penalties – as in no dessert tonight or no friend for sleepovers or early bedtime, etc. You get the gist, I’m sure.

I say ‘spare the rod’

Dear Rachel,

I disagree with your response to Hitting is for Cowards on both counts.

In the first episode, the stewardess did exactly the right thing. A mother who slaps a crying baby to stop him from crying is totally out of control. Had the stewardess just diffused the situation by offering to hold the baby for a short while, the mother would have continued to slap her crying baby when there would be no stewardess around to offer relief.

We’ve heard enough stories about babies killed by parents/caretakers when they would not stop crying. It was crucial to let the mother know in very clear terms that if she abused her baby she stood the very real risk of losing the child for good. I say kudos to that courageous stewardess.

As far as the gym teacher who removed an unruly student by the ear, physical engagement with a student is unacceptable unless someone is in danger of being physically hurt. Every professional knows that. A teacher may not allow his emotions to take control of his actions, no matter what the provocation.

It is also a stretch of the imagination to assume that this young man’s parents are to blame for not disciplining him when he was young. As a teacher, I would venture to guess that his parents were too harsh and draconian in their treatment of him. But neither of us can really know. Maybe he has wonderful parents and something happened on that particular day to set the kid off.

Hitting has no place in civilized society

Dear Rachel,

My heart breaks when I see one of many children in the same household going “off” for no apparent reason. Wonderful parents, ample love, great children – except for the one who decides that he/she wants to be “different.”

I mention this to point out that, right or wrong, hitting children by way of disciplining them does not necessarily trigger rebellion. Still, there is not much to be gained by using physical coercion on the recalcitrant child. If anything, this could serve to drive the child completely away.

The bottom line is we must pray for siyata d’shmaya (heavenly guidance) in all our undertakings, and especially when it comes to the daunting task of raising our children.

Just my humble opinion

Dear Rachel,

I am writing regarding your column on hitting children to make them behave. First of all, the “consequences” that Debbie referred to (08-27-2010, Interview series) may not have been of the physical kind. Psychological or emotional abuse can be equally devastating and painful.

Then there is the sad truth – that countless of us are children of the Holocaust (our parents having lived through a hell that we can never fathom). With their onerous task of rebuilding their lives from scratch, not to mention the emotional turmoil in coming to terms with their tremendous loss, they understandably had less patience and endurance than is required for the task of raising children.

Another thing to keep in mind: there are trouble-prone children who come from the best of homes, and there are fantastic children who emerge from less than ideal environments. At the same time, children’s individual natures need to be taken into account when dealing with obedience issues.

We can all agree, though, that corporal punishment has no place in any of our homes.

A survivor’s survivor

Dear Readers,

Along with the curse of pain in childbirth, we were decreed to have tzar gidul bonim – pain in the process of raising our children. An old saying comes to mind: No pain, no gain. The trials we go through teach us and strengthen us.

Most parents “grow” along with their children. One might say we learn on the job (and we are never too old to learn). The mom of multiple offspring is much more proficient at handling her younger children than she was her eldest. Experience offers us skills and matures us.

As for the wayward child, no one can sit in judgment as to why good parents are made to suffer such hardship. Another prevailing dilemma: At what point (if ever) should parents give up and cut ties to a child who has become totally estranged and is causing them endless tzar?

Someone once asked Rav Avigdor Miller for advice in coping with the hassles of raising a difficult brood. He replied, “Children are like apartment houses. When one tenant is screaming at the landlord to fix a leaky faucet, and another to repair a burnt wire in a fuse box, the landlord has only one thing in mind – the rent that he will collect at the end of the month. Children are the same – they are your olam haba; you will reap the reward for raising them in olam haba. Focus on this, and their noise will sound like beautiful music.”

Thank you all for your input.

* * * * *

We encourage women and men of all ages to send in their personal stories via email to rachel@jewishpress.com or by mail to Rachel/Chronicles, c/o The Jewish Press, 338 Third Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 11215. If you wish to make a contribution and help agunot, your tax-deductible donation should be sent to The Jewish Press Foundation. Please make sure to specify that it is to help agunot, as the foundation supports many worthwhile causes.

About the Author: We encourage women and men of all ages to send in their personal stories via email to rachel@jewishpress.com or by mail to Rachel/Chronicles, c/o The Jewish Press, 4915 16th Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 11204. If you wish to make a contribution and help agunot, your tax-deductible donation should be sent to The Jewish Press Foundation. Please make sure to specify that it is to help agunot, as the foundation supports many worthwhile causes.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Chronicles Of Crises In Our Communities – 11/11/10”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
IDF Naval commandos on a mission.
IDF Navy Special Forces Raid Gaza Rocket Facility
Latest Sections Stories
Aaron in front of Gush Katif-related school history project.

He wondered what it was like to live in Israel, to be religious.

Eller-071114-Book

The Open Kitchen is so appealing you practically want to eat the pages as you turn them.

Schonfeld-logo1

In reality, Baruch is one of many children who can be described as twice-exceptional. He is both gifted and struggling with a learning disability.

Since there is no “happenstance” in our world, we can only say that something of great import is taking place in the Holy Land.

Alternatively, you can try your absolute hardest to listen whenever she says anything.

As queen of the Maghreb, Aures Damia reigned in peace and prosperity until 702.

Some yeshivish couples do not believe in going out with other couples, but that does not mean that the women cannot have social lives.

That rescued little boy is Israel’s former chief rabbi, Israel Meir Lau, now chief rabbi of Tel Aviv.

An SRO crowd recently celebrated the 22nd Anniversary Breakfast of Congregation Bais Naftoli, honoring Long Beach Police Chief Jim McDonnell and community leader and philanthropist Ira Frankel.

Zimmer was popular with veteran teammates like Roy Campanella, Gil Hodges, Pee Wee Reese and Duke Snider – and with a rookie lefthander named Sandy Koufax.

Of course it is disingenuous to tell a person from a non-rabbinic, non-rosh yeshiva home to make an effort.

Israel’s coastline may be short, but there are still some real estate pearls waiting to be realized, offering cheap alternatives for sea front living. All you have to do is go further from the boundaries of Tel-Aviv and the Dan Block.

Explosive children or those with ODD are easily frustrated, demanding and inflexible.

    Latest Poll

    Israel's Iron Dome Anti-Missile System:





    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/family/chronicles-of-crises/chronicles-of-crises-in-our-communities-295/2010/11/11/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: