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Chronicles Of Crises In Our Communities

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Summertime: Should The Living Be Easy?

 

Dear Rachel,

I’m writing in response to your June 27th column that referred to how teens and young adults spend their summer vacations. From before I was old enough for working papers until I was educated enough for a “real job,” I spent my summers in the Catskills, working as a day camp counselor and lifeguard in various bungalow colonies.

The teenage girls with these jobs live like sardines in a can, with as many as twenty packed into bunk beds in tight, narrow rooms with few windows and no air conditioners and the persistent smell of sweat and mildew. We lived on lunches from the day camp, suppers from the parents in the bungalow colony, and whatever we could make in a sandwich maker in between.

Weekends were unsupervised and mostly spent hitching rides to and from Wal-Mart where we wandered the aisles and didn’t buy much. For spending our summers this way, counselors were paid $350-$450 a month plus tips and all the after-hours babysitting we could get. (Lifeguards received slightly more. Mother’s helpers were the worst off, receiving less pay, no tips and no extra babysitting money.)

Doing this for six summers did build a bit of a savings account, but only a bit. When it came to paying for college, my savings were a drop in the bucket. Working a daily job that paid more than minimum wage contributed more. Working summer internships that paid better contributed even more. And academic scholarships for good grades and test scores paid the most.

Sometimes when I hear recent college grads sigh that they are enjoying their last summer vacation until retirement, I feel like I missed out. I haven’t had a summer vacation since I was thirteen. When I hear about teens using their summers to do constructive things, like learn a language, complete a project or volunteer for a cause, I wonder if I missed out on other growth opportunities as well.

So between the pathetic income generated and the lost opportunities, I have to wonder: does working all summer have any real benefit to a teen? And I have to answer: yes, some. Working taught me to be ambitious and to get out of that stinky bunkhouse. I plowed my counselor income into a lifeguard course, and my lifeguarding money into WSI (water safety instructor) certification. I had the chance to make a myriad of workplace errors in an environment with few real consequences. And I learned the amazing versatility of the sandwich maker. But it’s hard to say that I couldn’t have learned these lessons any other way or caught up within the first few years of professional work.

So to the teens who spend their summers working: kudos.  Your work ethic will get you far in life. For the teens who don’t: enjoy it while you can. And to all the mothers judging “kids these days” – please stop. There are as many good reasons for a teen to not work as there are for them to work. Mind your own children, and let other people mind theirs.

Open-Minded

 

Dear Open-Minded,

You don’t reveal how many years back you are referring to, but conditions must have improved somewhat for counselors and lifeguards since that time. Regardless, you don’t sound too regretful about having possibly “missed out.” And I’ll bet you have some great memories to boot. Sure, not everyone is cut out for roughing it like you did, but while teens can spend their summers in a number of constructive ways, those who lazy away their vacation time are the ones who are really missing out.

At the age of eleven, I spent six weeks in the country as a mother’s helper. (My family was back in the city, so I was pretty much on my own.) A family friend had a new baby and needed help with a toddler. I happily volunteered and off I went. If my memory serves me well, I was paid a whole $20 bill for my trouble – a substantial sum in those days, especially for an 11-year-old. But the best thing I took home with me was the friendships I formed with kids my age and memories of the great time we had (during the hours my help was not required).

Moreover, I recall coming home and heading straight to the local dime store to blow my wage on tchachkes for my younger sibs. Now that was a high, having my own money and spending it as I wished. Of course at eleven there is zero understanding of financial planning.

You answer your own question when you ask whether working all summer offers real benefit to a teen. You opine that it does to some degree, for, as you experienced, it imbues one with ambition. Another reason readily comes to mind: it teaches responsibility and also offers the teenager a hint of what it takes for parents to run a household. Children naturally take the comforts of home for granted and hardly give thought or consideration to the effort that goes into maintaining those comforts. When they take a job for real is when they begin to have a modicum of appreciation for what it means to support a family.

Allow me to take it a step further: Grown children still living at home with their parents and going to work should be contributing to the household income. I can hear some readers gasping in disbelief. Parents taking rent from their children? Ridiculous, they say. Not so. There is no reason why adult children who earn a wage shouldn’t be paying their fair share, especially if their parents are struggling financially or just making do.

This also goes a long way in instilling a sense of responsibility in young adults, which will certainly bode well for them in the long run. In fact, if the parents don’t need the money, they can set it aside and present the accumulated sum to their children when they are ready to settle down on their own. The unexpected “gift” will be greatly appreciated, while an important lesson will have been learned.

Thank you for sharing your opinion and experiences with our readers.

About the Author: We encourage women and men of all ages to send in their personal stories via email to rachel@jewishpress.com or by mail to Rachel/Chronicles, c/o The Jewish Press, 4915 16th Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. 11204. If you wish to make a contribution and help agunot, your tax-deductible donation should be sent to The Jewish Press Foundation. Please make sure to specify that it is to help agunot, as the foundation supports many worthwhile causes.


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