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March 31, 2015 / 11 Nisan, 5775
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Part 26 – Relating To Your In-laws


Schonbuch-Rabbi-Daniel

You may think you said “I do” to just one person on your wedding day, but the reality of married life is that you actually vowed to honor several people. Marriage comes with new challenges; some of which you had no idea were waiting for you. Maybe you’re lucky enough to adore your in-laws instantly and consistently, but unfortunately many people will come up against some roadblocks on the way.

In our culture, people tend to joke about the classic in-law relationship as being difficult and burdensome. Despite our tendency to speak disparagingly about a mother-in-law who is pushy, controlling and always critical, our in-laws are an important part of marriage and the development of our family.

When you marry someone, you marry his or her family, too. For some, that can require a major adjustment, so it may be helpful to review tips for getting along with your in-laws. That way, you can avoid or head off serious conflicts before they damage your marriage. As many of us would agree, getting along with your in-laws is almost as important as getting along with your husband or wife.

Take Leah, 27, who had considerable difficulty dealing with her mother-in-law.  Her mother-in-law constantly criticized her and she felt that no matter what she did, disparaging comments would be made in front of Leah’s husband and other people. For example, if Leah would give her daughter some ice cream for dessert, her mother-in-law would say, “Don’t you think she has had too much sugar today?” And if Leah decided not to give her daughter a treat, her mother in-law would probably say, “Do you really think it is fair not to give her one, when the other kids are having one?” No matter what she did, Leah felt she couldn’t win.  She chose to be quiet, but inside she felt like she was about to explode.

No one is saying that in-law relationships are easy. The Torah describes conflicts between Yaakov and his father-in-law, Lavan, where each accused the other of being a swindler. Of course, marrying two daughters of the same man compounded Yaakov’s problems!  We don’t have to deal with that level of trouble today, fortunately. Still, getting along with your in-laws could be one of the toughest relational situations you will ever face.

Married people typically have to deal with a mother-in-law, father-in-law, and any number of sisters- or brothers-in-law, not to mention the in-law grandparents, cousins, aunts, and uncles. Holiday celebrations and family get-togethers can be fraught with the difficulties of trying to figure out whom to invite or not invite. And it can be even worse, when the two sides of the family don’t get along.

While getting along with your in-laws might not be your number one priority right after getting married, over time you will come to realize the value of maintaining positive interactions with extended family. Your spouse will appreciate the efforts you make to get along with his relatives, and that can only improve your marriage overall. Look for the positive traits in members of your new family by marriage, and no one will be disappointed.

The key to in-law relationships is to be respectful while at the same time ensure that your relationship with your spouse takes priority over theirs.

In truth, although that situation may at times be painful to deal with, remember that you are married to your spouse and not them.  Don’t expect them to be loving and sensitive to your needs, they may not be able or willing to do so. Focus on your own behavior, which is all you really can control.  Always act respectfully and stay focused on the relationship with your spouse.

Deena, 26 and Yaakov, 27, came to speak with me about the way Yaakov’s mother treats Deena. She explained that, “The last time Yaakov and I visited her it happened again. Just trying to be nice and helpful, I washed all the pots and pans after dinner. No sooner had I finished than she (her mother in-law) rewashed them all over again!”

Deena is not a newlywed. She has been married to Yaakov for five years. That whole time, she and Yaakov’s mom have silently struggled with being civil to each other. When Yaakov’s mom comes to visit, Deena really tries to get the house clean and comfortable for her. But after arriving, her mother-in-law pulls out the cleaning supplies and shines the bathrooms and kitchen. Deena assumes she’s doing this because she thinks Deena is a slob and lives in filth.

After the last pots-and-pans fiasco, Deena spilled her frustrations to Yaakov’s older sister, Rivkah. “I know your mother hates me and thinks I’m a slob and a bad person. I can’t seem to do anything to please her.”

Rivkah replied, “Deena, it’s not about you. It’s about Mom’s compulsion to have everything spotless. I grew up with her. I know her. She was like this before you and Yaakov even met. When she rewashes the pots and pans, it’s not condemning you. It’s simply that she has different – and what most would consider absurd – standards of what is acceptably clean.”

About the Author: Rabbi Daniel Schonbuch, MA, LMFT is an expert in marriage counseling, pre-marital education, treating anxiety and depression, and helping teens in crisis with offices For more information visit www.JewishMarriageSupport.com, e-mail rabbischonbuch@yahoo.com or call 646-428-4723.


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Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/family/marriage-relationships/part-26-relating-to-your-in-laws/2009/08/07/

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