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May 25, 2015 / 7 Sivan, 5775
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Parenting Our Children
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Posted on: May 2nd, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

I am Ethan. You may not understand me, or the way I feel today. You may not understand my reasoning for things I do or say. The reasons why I’m so loud and say things over and over again, Why I run so differently or lose my homework every now and then. I write my […]

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Posted on: April 25th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

I know what you are thinking. What possible situation could cause a professional to advise a parent to “Pray hard that your children ignore you”?

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Posted on: April 25th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

In our culture of conspicuous consumption, it is not unusual for children to ask for everything they set their eyes on. And, if we are fortunate enough to have the funds to buy them all that their hearts desire, we tend to think, “I can do it, why not?” There are, however, importance values that our children can learn when we set limits.

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Posted on: April 19th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

With the constant pressures placed on us in our fast paced lives, sometimes we all feel like we need a vacation. Everyone needs a break now and then – to relax their bodies and their minds. Research has shown that too much stress can cause:

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Posted on: April 11th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

Several years ago, during the height of the balanced literacy controversy in New York City, I wrote about the different approaches to reading. With some more years of research and hands-on experience, I would like to revisit this integral topic: How do children learn to read?

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Posted on: April 5th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

“Mommy, can you read me the book, again?” Shmuel asked his mother, holding up The Little Engine That Could. “Of course, Shmuel. Let’s do that,” Chevy smiled. She was tired from a long day, but with her four kids huddled around, she was happy to sit and read in the living room. “Chug, chug, chug. Puff, puff, puff. Ding-dong, ding-dong. The little train rumbled over the track,” Chevy began.

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Posted on: March 28th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

Today, more children than ever are diagnosed with ADHD and the disorder is widely researched and accommodated in schools. However, a lot of children do not necessarily understand ADHD – whether they or their friend is the one suffering from the disorder. To that end, I wrote a children’s book about ADHD, My Friend, The Troublemaker, to help children better comprehend what is going on in the classroom with themselves or their classmates.

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Posted on: March 15th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

Four-year-old Naomi stayed in the block corner every day during playtime, building an intricate tower. She rarely spoke except when spoken to during circle time. In the yard, Naomi enjoyed swinging calmly and watching the other children jump rope or kick the ball.

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Posted on: March 7th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

“But, I can’t reach the light!” Yoni yelled after his father asked him to turn on the hallway light. “Yoni, you can reach the switch. You have done it hundreds of times before. You just need to go brush your teeth and in order to get to the bathroom, you need to go through the hallway,” his father, Noam, sighed.

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Posted on: February 28th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

Q: My daughter’s teachers have been telling me that she has trouble with her executive functions. I know she is not organized and often forgets to finish her homework, but I am not sure exactly what they mean. Can you clarify the term?

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Posted on: February 21st, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

“So, Mrs. Cohen, we spoke on the phone about why Baruch is coming in today, but Baruch, why don’t you tell me why you think you are here?” “I’m bad at school,” Baruch said, barely glancing in my direction.“ Do you mean that you don’t get the grades you would like?” “No, I’m just not good at school. My teachers don’t like me, my tests are horrible, and my friends think I’m dumb.”

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Posted on: February 14th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

“You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take” – Wayne Gretzky, Hall of Fame Hockey Player “I can’t seem to focus.” “For as long as I can remember, I have been struggling with organization.” “I’m really bad at sitting still.” “I just can’t lose weight.” “I will never make it to the dinner on […]

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Posted on: February 7th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

Chaya had a knack for numbers from when she was young. While baking with her mother as a four year old, Chaya would double recipes easily.

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Posted on: February 7th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

Recently a popular Jewish weekly magazine featured a story depicting the life of a young boy whose parents were divorced. Each parent had re-married, establishing new families. Their shared custody of this son, and he spent substantial time with each of his parent's new families. Giving a voice to the child of divorce was the intention of the story. It highlighted the distress children feel as well as the confusing messages they often receive from the adults in their lives.

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Posted on: January 31st, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

Yossi’s mother was at her wit’s end. Yossi’s grey pants were wet again. It was the second time that week.

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Posted on: January 25th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

In his best selling book, The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do In Life and Business, Charles Duhigg argues that most of the choices we make may feel like products of well-considered decision making. In reality, they are not.

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Posted on: January 17th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

In the 1950’s, bestselling author Rudolf Flesch offered to give a friend’s son, who was a struggling reader, some help with reading. He soon discovered that the problem did not lie in the boy’s intelligence, but rather in the way that reading was taught to him in school. To set out his reading principles, Flesch wrote a now famous book entitled, Why Johnny Can’t Read – and What You Can Do About It. In it, Flesch outlined the basic approach of phonics, an effective and important manner of teaching reading.

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Posted on: January 11th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

Avital walked into the test feeling great. She had studied the night before and she was sure to ace her grammar test. But, suddenly, when her teacher passed out the test paper, Avital found her palms sweating and her heart racing.

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Posted on: January 4th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

Dear Dr. Yael: My seven-year-old daughter is having a very difficult time socially in school. Another girl is making fun of her, and I do not know how to fix the problem. Because she wants to be friends with this girl (although I am not sure why), she puts herself in situations where she is the target of the girl’s ridicule.

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Posted on: January 4th, 2013

SectionsFamilyParenting Our Children

Meet Noam, a ninth grader I worked with several years ago. Noam came to my office because he was struggling with his biology curriculum. Though Noam was extremely smart, he had ADHD, which made it hard for him to focus on all of the material presented during class. Before we even looked at the material together, I asked Noam how he learned best. His face was blank as he responded, “Um, Mrs. Schonfeld, I really am not sure.”

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Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/family/parenting-our-children/more-than-meltdowns/2014/07/04/

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