web analytics
May 29, 2015 / 11 Sivan, 5775
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post


Gefilte Fish Gone Hip at The Gefilteria

Eller-011813-gefilte-fish

Artisan gefilte fish.

For some, the phrase seems like an oxymoron. While salmon, chilean sea bass and tilapia may all be in vogue, gefilte fish, the traditional ground fish mixture that is de rigueur in Ashkenazic Jewish households at Shabbos and Yom Tov meals, is like the Henny Youngman of fish: it gets no respect. But if a group of Brooklyn entrepreneurs have their way, that may be about to change as The Gefilteria’s product line makes its way into retail outlets.

The Gefilteria is the brainchild of 28-year-old Jeffrey Yoskowitz, a long time gefilte fish lover, who grew up eating his grandmother, Ruth Markiewicz’s, homemade gefilte fish.

“When she stopped making gefilte fish, we were still able to get a quality product from a nearby store that made Jewish comfort foods,” explained Yoskowitz, who grew up in Basking Ridge, New Jersey. “But the quality of the fish wasn’t consistent and we had what I like to call ‘The Gefilte Fish’ crisis in my family. It never even occurred to me then that I could just make my own.”

But with a background in the food world, which included importing organic food from the Negev as well as working as a pickler at a Jewish farm in Connecticut, Yoskowitz decided that it was time to follow in his grandmother’s footsteps and try his hand at gefilte fish.

“Unfortunately today many look down on gefilte fish, but generations ago it was the high point of many people’s week,” said Yoskowitz. “Gefilte fish became a joke when it was mass produced and stuffed into a jar; in all honesty, they shouldn’t be allowed to call that stuff gefilte fish.”

As Yoskowitz turned his thoughts towards fish making, he teamed up with two friends: Liz Alpern, an experienced cook and food writer who had worked with renowned cookbook author Joan Nathan, and Jackie Lilinshtein, a childhood friend with a strong business background who also shared a fondness for traditional Jewish cooking. Together, the three decided that high quality, fresh gefilte fish would not only change many people’s perception of the often maligned traditional fare but would be a welcome addition to the food world.

“Gefilte fish is an important part of our rich Ashkenazic tradition and I am proud to continue the culinary legacy of my family,” declared Yoskowitz. “Many Ashkenazic foods have peasant origins, as people made do with what they had and made extensive use of fermented foods to last them through the cold winter days. I value those rich traditions, some of which have been lost over the years and we wanted to return to the foods of our ancestors, while at the same time have some fun with those items as well as maintaining the highest standards of freshness and quality.”

Yoskowitz worked with his gefilte fish guru, Grandma Ruth, while Alpern rummaged through her cookbooks and consulted with Joan Nathan as the pair attempted to formulate a recipe that would meet their three criteria: texture, taste and aesthetics. Ultimately they devised a recipe for their fresh gefilte fish loaf which consists of whitefish and pike complemented by a ribbon on salmon running through its center.

“Our whitefish and pike come from the Great Lakes and we use sushi grade salmon, all among the best fish out there,” said Yoskowitz “There is no filler so that we can embrace the freshness of the fish. Our gefilte fish is gluten free and low in calories. It has some sweetness to it but the flavor profile is more complex. I believe in the onion as the staple of Jewish cuisine and that comes out in this product.”

For those who have difficulty embracing the notion of boutique gefilte fish, Yoskowitz offers the following suggestion: “Think of it as a fresh fish terrine.”

In addition to gefilte fish, The Gefilteria also offers several other products including kvass, a live-culture fermented beet drink, which Yoskowitz touts as a pro-biotic with stomach soothing capabilities, russel beets, horseradish and spicy carrot horseradish

“Carrot horseradish is our homage to the carrots traditionally served on gefilte fish,” said Yoskowitz. “Boiled carrots looked like a little yarmulka on top of the fish and never looked nearly as good as our spicy carrot horseradish, which was listed in Time Out New York as one of the top one hundred best products of the 2012. We wanted to carry on the carrot tradition with some newness and freshness. There is no reason Ashkenazic food has to be drab.”

About the Author: Sandy Eller is a freelance writer who writes for numerous websites, newspapers, magazines and many private clients. She can be contacted at sandyeller1@gmail.com.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Gefilte Fish Gone Hip at The Gefilteria”

Comments are closed.

Current Top Story
What's happened to NYC's Celebrate Israel Parade?
Israel Rejects as ‘False’ UJA Federation’s Claims about Israel Parade ‘Inclusion’
Latest Sections Stories
Respler-logo-NEW

When I complain, she tells me it is retail therapy.

West-Coast-logo

Tal Dimenstein has been selected to present her ELI Talk about Appreciation during this year’s conference in Chicago.

How is it possible that some of our people cannot see what I see, the miracle of the existence of the state of Israel?

Birobidzhan railway station sign is the world’s only one spelling the town’s name in Yiddish letters

She’s seen as a poster child for The Jewish Home’s efforts to reach beyond its Orthodox base.

Girls don’t usually learn Gemara. Everyone knows that.

Mordechai and his men shared a strong mutual loyalty.

“Can I wear tefillin in the bathroom?” That was the question US Private Nuchim Lebensohn wrote to Mike Tress, president of the Agudath Israel Youth Council, in a letter dated November 18, 1942. Lebensohn was not your typical young American GI. Polish by birth, he was forty-three years old and married when he was drafted […]

To what extent is your child displaying defiance?

This therapist kept focusing on how “I could do better,” never on how we could make the marriage work.

Mistrust that has lingered after the fiasco in Ferguson, Missouri, has edged the issue forward.

“The observance of a kosher diet is a key tenet of Judaism, and one which no state has the right to deny,” said Nathan Diament, executive director for public policy of the Orthodox Union.

More Articles from Sandy Eller
Justin Zemser, a”h

“…his neshamah reached out to us to have the zechus of Torah learning to take with him on his final journey.”

Food-Talk---Eller-logo

It’s hard not to be intrigued by recipes with names like Thanksgiving Stuffing Soup, Braised Chicken with Rhubarb Gravy and Vidalia Onion Fritters with Sambal Yogurt Dip.

A graduate of Rhode Island’s Johnson & Wales College of Culinary Arts, the very personable Massin came to NoBo with both a solid education and years of experience at Mike’s Bistro and The Prime Grill.

For all their deliciousness, frozen beverages do not stand the test of time well, as any ice or frozen fruit thickening your drink will melt into a watery mess.

“People who never buy cookbooks are getting this one,” said Victoria. “They read it cover to cover and find it so interesting.”

It goes without saying that when it comes to your kids, safety is always your number one priority.

While we are all accustomed to the occasional recipe substitutions – swapping milk for creamer, applesauce for oil – gluten-free cooking is a whole different ballgame.

Kitchen surfing is a unique concept that brings professional chefs to your home to prepare a meal in your own kitchen.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/food/kashrut-scene/gefilte-fish-gone-hip-at-the-gefilteria/2013/01/18/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: