web analytics
December 23, 2014 / 1 Tevet, 5775
 
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post
8000 meals Celebrate Eight Days of Chanukah – With 8,000 Free Meals Daily to Israel’s Poor

Join Meir Panim’s campaign to “light up” Chanukah for families in need.



Do The Dough!

Somethings-Cooking-logo

Yeast dough is considered one of the most basic but complicated of the dough family. Just think of the first cakes you made – I’m almost sure they weren’t yeast cakes.

But mine were!

As a girl I really had no inkling about “kitchen stuff” until I noticed something interesting. Twice a year my mother would make a cookie and cake Kiddush for our shul to mark the yahrtzeits of my father’s parents who were killed in the Holocaust.

Those cake platters were laden with all sorts of baked goodies – melt-in-your-mouth cakes alongside mouthwatering cookies, professionally made and gone almost as soon as they hit the table. But although Mom prepared quite a variety, I noticed something missing from her overflowing plates. There were none of the fluffy, yeasty kokosh and moon cakes that I especially loved.

“Why don’t you ever make yeast cakes, Mommy?” I wondered aloud.

“Oh, that’s not for me! My yeast dough never seems to rise to my expectations. I’ll just stick to cookie dough.”

Then and there I decided: “Come next Kiddush, there’ll be fantastic, fluffy kokosh cakes on my mother’s cookie platters and I’ll make them!”

So, I practiced that summer on my friends in camp. I was counselor in a small Canadian camp that bunked 120 campers in all. On the 17th of Tammuz and the 9th of Av, when there were no meals served, the cook had the day off and I got the kitchen key!

I was in full reign, preparing bowls of dough rising, waiting to be turned into sizzly cheesy pizzas, chocolaty sweet kokosh cakes and soft, supple onion pitas to “break the fast” on.

Judging from how quickly everything disappeared, I knew I was pretty good at making yeast dough and more importantly, the dough was good to me – it rose to every occasion and never disappointed me.

True to my decision, that year my yeast cakes found a place of honor on mother’s Kiddush platters.

Until today, there’s nothing more gratifying for me than kneading yeast dough. As it rises on my counter, I feel an elation rise within me too. The cakes release their yeasty aroma as they bake, expanding in the heat and in my heart.

To date, I’ve baked tens of thousands challahs, rolls and yeast cakes in hundreds of shapes, sizes and flavors at home, for simchas and in my workshops. Which is good news for those of you suffering from Yeast Dough Phobia. Because over time, I’ve collected quite a few tips for a successful experience in preparing yeast dough.

Of course you could always just run out to your preferred bakery and buy their kokosh cake but in my opinion, nothing can beat the heavenly scent of your yeast cake baking in your kitchen!

All you “knead” to know is a few simple rules like correct temperature, mixing, rising and rolling. Besides, the more you make yeast dough, the better you get the feel for it and the better it will “behave” for you. Hands-on experience is the best teacher around!

For starters, how does your dough grow?

There are two methods for yeast dough rising. 1. The warm method which is most commonly used and 2. The cold method which chefs sometimes prefer.

Here’s how the cold method works:

After the dough is ready, put it into a large plastic bag and tie loosely on top. Refrigerate overnight or up to 3 days. After a few hours, the bag will resemble a blown up balloon. This means the fermentation gases are doing their job (even though they were “left in the cold”).

A few hours before you’re ready to make your yeast cake or rolls, remove the bag of dough from the refrigerator and leave in the bag on your counter until the dough reaches room temperature. Proceed as the recipe instructs.

Here’s a question I received from Sarah about kokosh cake filling:

Q: “Do you have a good chocolate filling for my kokosh cake. Somehow mine always sinks into the dough till it seems as if there’s no filling at all. Do you have a recipe for the “store bought” kind?”

A: The chocolate filling I use for my kokosh cake is easy to make and since it’s made with dry ingredients, easy to “spread.” It imitates the store bought filling in that it’s oozy without oozing out of the roll or into the dough.

I’m including a recipe for whole wheat kokosh cake along with its drippy chocolate filling. Why not make it a bit healthier while you’re at it?

Notice the special mixing method explained here. This ensures light and fluffy dough despite its being made with whole wheat flour.

Perfect Kokosh Cake

6-8 servings

Ingredients for dough

6 cups whole wheat flour
2 tablespoons active dry yeast, or 1 cube fresh yeast
¾ cup sugar (or less)
1 cup canola oil
1 teaspoon salt
2 eggs
1½-2 cups lukewarm water
1 egg for egg wash

Ingredients for chocolate filling

½ cup cocoa
1 cup sugar
½ cup confectioner’s sugar
1 teaspoon rum extract

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350º F (175º C).

In an electric mixer with the beater attachment, combine 3 cups flour, salt, yeast, water, sugar, oil, and eggs for 3-4 minutes. Add the other 3 cups flour and change the attachment to the kneading hook. Mix for 5 minutes until a soft dough is formed.

Cover the dough and set in a warm place (or in the refrigerator as explained previously).

Divide the dough into 8 pieces and form into balls. Line your work surface with a piece of disposable tablecloth to enable a neat rolling experience. Slightly flour the plastic and roll out each ball to as thin a sheet as possible – it shouldn’t (and won’t!) tear.

To prepare the filling, in a medium bowl, combine the cocoa, sugar, and confectioners’ sugar. Sprinkle the cocoa and sugar mixture generously onto each piece of rolled-out dough, then drizzle drops of rum onto the cocoa mixture.

Roll up each “sheet” carefully, jelly-roll fashion, and place in a standard loaf pan. Let rise in a warm spot about half an hour.

Prepare egg wash and brush onto the dough. Bake until golden, for about 30 minutes.

TopTip: If you want your chocolate filling to be extra “runny,” spread the dough “sheet” with some oil before sprinkling the filling on top.

Next time: My whole wheat challah dough recipe plus tips for rising and rolling.

About the Author: Mindy Rafalowitz is a recipe developer and food columnist for over 15 years. She has published a best selling cookbook in Hebrew for Pesach and the gluten sensitive. Mindy is making progress on another specialty cookbbok for English readers. For kitchen questions or to purchase a sample recipe booklet at an introductory price, contact Mindy at mitbashelpo@gmail.com.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Do The Dough!”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
What happened to the Internet access? (illustrative)
Plot Thickens in Sony Pictures North Korea Hack Attack Saga
Latest Sections Stories
Schonfeld-logo1

When someone with a fixed mindset has a negative interaction with a friend or loved one, he or she immediately projects that rejection onto him or herself saying: “I’m unlovable.”

Respler-121914

How many potential shidduchim are not coming about because we, the mothers, are not allowing them to go through?

Kupfer-121914

Is the Torah offering nechama by subtly hinting that death brings reunion with loved ones who preceded you?

She approached Holofernes and, with a sword concealed under her robe, severed his head.

Here are examples of games that need to be played by more than one person and an added bonus: they’re all Shabbos-friendly.

The incident was completely unforeseeable. The only term to describe the set of circumstances surrounding it is “freak occurrence.”

The first Chabad Center in Broward County, Chabad of South Broward, now runs nearly fifty programs and agencies. T

The NHS was also honored to have Bob Diener as keynote speaker.

Written with flowing language and engaging style, Attar weaves a spell that combines mystery, humor, adventure and Kabbalah in the most magical place in the world, the Old City of erusalem.

There are those who highlight the diversity of these different teachings, seeing each rebbe as teaching a separate path.

Rav Dynovisz will be speaking in Hebrew on Wednesday, January 7, at 7:30 p.m.

Rabbi Simeon Schreiber, senior chaplain at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach, saw a small room in the hospital that was dark and dismal but could be used for Sabbath guests.

“The secret to a good donut is using quality ingredients and the ability to be patient and give them time to proof.”

More Articles from Mindy Rafalowitz
Mindy-092614-Choc-Roll

I should be pursuing plateaus of pure and holy, but I’m busy delving and developing palatable palates instead.

Mindy-082914-Choc-Roll

You’re probably wondering why the greatest advocate of fast and easy preps in the kitchen is talking about layer cakes, right?

“Whole soybeans,” was the answer. “They have all the advantages of soy without being processed with hexane,” she added.

One thing I did know, judging from the urgency in her voice, was that she wanted an explanation fast.

For your average Israeli, spicy hot might be fun, but not for me. Allow me to repeat – easy does it!

 It’s no joke – Pesach is looming closer and there’s still so much to do. This is definitely not a time to rest! Who isn’t putting in their “all” these days? But there is just so much you can do. Keep in mind that the key to success is in the hands of Hashem, so […]

For me, there’s nothing like making challahs for Shabbos. But I can’t say it’s always been the height of my week. There was a time when baking fluffy, light-as-a-feather challahs was a total mystery to me.

Yeast dough is considered one of the most basic but complicated of the dough family. Just think of the first cakes you made – I’m almost sure they weren’t yeast cakes.
But mine were!

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/food/recipes/do-the-dough/2013/06/28/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: