web analytics
December 26, 2014 / 4 Tevet, 5775
 
At a Glance
Sections
Sponsored Post
8000 meals Celebrate Eight Days of Chanukah – With 8,000 Free Meals Daily to Israel’s Poor

Join Meir Panim’s campaign to “light up” Chanukah for families in need.



Home » Sections » Food » Recipes »

Simple Home Cooking

Welcome to Part III – what to do with the cooked chicken. Our job is to rehydrate it, change the way it looks, and, at times, hide it using dough, eggs, mayonnaise, or sauce. I have found that making up fancy names for the dish not only adds flair, but will help your family know what to ask for next time. Unless otherwise stated these recipes serve 4-6 people. (Note: Though we use the word chicken – each recipe works just as well with meat or turkey.)

1. Salads

Chicken Salad A Ingredients

4 quarters of cooked or baked chicken ½ an onion ½ cup cooked carrots 4 pickles 4 tbsp. mayonnaise Salt & pepper to taste 4 tbsp. pickle juice or vinegar 1 tbsp. sugar (optional) Parsley for decoration

Remove chicken from the bones and cut into small cubes. Place in a large bowl. Cut carrots, onions, and pickles into small pieces and add to chicken. Add the mayonnaise and seasoning and mix well. Serve decorated with parsley and carrot slices on top.

Variations- Add ½ cup peas or ½ cup corn or 2 hard boiled eggs chopped. Add mayonnaise as needed.

Chicken Salad B Ingredients

3 cups cooked chicken, cubed 1 ½ cups raisins or dried cranberries 3 celery stalks, chopped ½ cup apple peeled and diced 2/3 cup mayonnaise 2 tbsp. lemon juice or apple cider vinegar Salt and pepper to taste ½ cup any nuts or sunflower seeds Lettuce

In a large bowl mix mayonnaise, salt, pepper and lemon juice Add chicken, raisins apples, and celery. Mix well. Before serving, mix in nuts and serve on a bed of lettuce leaves.

Lima Bean Chicken Salad

3-4 cups cooked chicken, coarsely diced 1 onion, chopped 1 can lima beans (drained) 4 cooked potatoes, sliced 2 tomatoes, sliced 1 tsp. sugar 1 can corn, drained 4 tbsp. oil 3-4 cups chicken soup 2 tsp. crushed garlic Salt, pepper to taste 4-5 tbsp. chopped parsley

Bring chicken soup to a boil. Add sugar, garlic, 1tsp of salt and a dash of pepper. Cook for 5 minutes. Add all ingredients (reserve 3 tbsp parsley for garnish), cook for another minute and shut the heat. Taste, correct seasoning. Serve hot or cold.

2. Blintzes

This is such a delicious dish; no one will know its made from leftovers.

Ingredients for blintzes

4 cups flour 4 cups water 6 eggs 2 tbsp. oil Salt and pepper Oil to coat pan when frying

Put flour in a bowl and add water, eggs, oil, and spices. Mix well with a metal whisk. The consistency should be like buttermilk. Fill a ladleful of batter and pour in only enough to coat the bottom of a heated and greased frying pan. Tilt the batter in the frying pan until the blintz is as thin as possible. Flip over when the surface looks dry. Fry for an additional minute, then slide out onto a plate. Sometimes the first 2-3 blintzes will not come out perfect, that’s because the frying pan is not hot enough, don’t be discouraged just continue. In between blintzes use a piece of paper towel to dip in oil and grease the frying pan.

Yields about 3 dozen blintzes.

Tip: For Pesach use the same batter substituting potato starch for flour. These blintzes can be cut thin and used as noodles for the soup or served with the following filling.

Ingredients for chicken filling

6 chicken quarters (preferably bottoms) 2 cups drained fried onions. Salt and pepper, to taste.

Strip chicken off the bone and cut into very small pieces. (You can use a food processor for a few seconds, but it tastes better cut with a knife.) Make sure any bits of bone are removed. Add in the fried onions and seasoning. Mix and taste.

Put about 4 tbsp of the mixture near one edge of each blintz. Fold over both sides and roll lengthwise, to the other edge. Line up in a 9 x 13 pan.

Ingredient for sauce

4 tbsp flour 6 tbsp oil 4 tbsp mushroom soup mix Salt pepper to taste 4 cups cold water

Before starting, prepare the water and keep it near the stove. In a pot, mix first four ingredients very well. Turn heat to high and keep stirring until mixture turns light brown. Make sure it’s not too dark. (If you burn it, start all over again.) Once it’s the right color pour in all the water and keep mixing until fully incorporated and there are no lumps. Continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until thick sauce forms. Pour over blintzes. At this point you can put the pan in the freezer to reheat later or place in 250° until thoroughly heated and ready to serve.

About the Author:


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Simple Home Cooking”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
The Al Haeche kosher restaurant in Paris had bullet holes through the front window. Dec. 24, 2014.
Parisian Kosher Restaurant Second Anti-Semitic Gun Attack This Week
Latest Sections Stories

Today’s smiles are in the merit of my friend and I made a conscious effort to smile throughout the day.

Schonfeld-logo1

When someone with a fixed mindset has a negative interaction with a friend or loved one, he or she immediately projects that rejection onto him or herself saying: “I’m unlovable.”

How many potential shidduchim are not coming about because we, the mothers, are not allowing them to go through?

Is the Torah offering nechama by subtly hinting that death brings reunion with loved ones who preceded you?

She approached Holofernes and, with a sword concealed under her robe, severed his head.

Here are examples of games that need to be played by more than one person and an added bonus: they’re all Shabbos-friendly.

The incident was completely unforeseeable. The only term to describe the set of circumstances surrounding it is “freak occurrence.”

The first Chabad Center in Broward County, Chabad of South Broward, now runs nearly fifty programs and agencies. T

The NHS was also honored to have Bob Diener as keynote speaker.

Written with flowing language and engaging style, Attar weaves a spell that combines mystery, humor, adventure and Kabbalah in the most magical place in the world, the Old City of erusalem.

There are those who highlight the diversity of these different teachings, seeing each rebbe as teaching a separate path.

Rav Dynovisz will be speaking in Hebrew on Wednesday, January 7, at 7:30 p.m.

Rabbi Simeon Schreiber, senior chaplain at Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach, saw a small room in the hospital that was dark and dismal but could be used for Sabbath guests.

More Articles from Yaffa Fruchter
Stuffed Cabbage

When cooking early for Pesach I always start with foods that require patience and attention, which we have in short supply as Yom Tov gets closer.

Fruchter-Cooking-logo

The holidays are upon us which means lots of food. So, what to do with all those leftovers? Here are some creative ideas.

As we mentioned last time, chicken or meat leftovers can be used in a variety of ways. First, you have to evaluate how much food is available and then with easy planning you can calculate how many family meals can be prepared from it. The following are some wonderful suggestions for meals.

Welcome to Part III – what to do with the cooked chicken. Our job is to rehydrate it, change the way it looks, and, at times, hide it using dough, eggs, mayonnaise, or sauce. I have found that making up fancy names for the dish not only adds flair, but will help your family know what to ask for next time. Unless otherwise stated these recipes serve 4-6 people. (Note: Though we use the word chicken – each recipe works just as well with meat or turkey.)

Welcome back to Simple Home Cooking. Last time we focused on making a large pot of chicken soup. This week, as promised, we will discuss how to use all the cooked vegetables from the soup to create many dishes.

This column will focus on making cooking easy and simple. We begin with a perennial favorite dish – Chicken Soup.

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/food/recipes/simple-home-cooking-2/2012/03/26/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: