web analytics
July 31, 2014 / 4 Av, 5774
Israel at War: Operation Protective Edge
 
 
Sections
Sponsored Post
Visiting IDF bases and receiving briefings from IDF officers. Ultimate Mission – November 2014

Don’t miss this opportunity to explore Israel off the beaten track, feel the conflict first hand, understand the security issues and politic realities, and have an unforgettable trip!



Home » Sections » Food »

Tampering With Traditional Fare


I sometimes — ok, often — envy my friends who cook daring, exotic dishes and throw crazy things like fruit into veggie salads.  Innovative stuff like that doesn’t go over so well in my house.  I can prepare it, but Hubby will stare down at the unfamiliar thing on his plate with suspicious distaste.  He’s a creature of habit, even more so a creature of tradition.  Not only does he want to eat the same things, he wants it prepared in the most traditional way.  To him, it’s not really Shabbos without classic gefilte fish and chicken soup.  And even when its 99 degrees outside, steaming hot cholent and potato kugel better be on the menu. 

 

 Defending this bias with his favorite phrase “well, that’s how I had it growing up ” he will insist on chopped liver, even when there are a dozen other sides on the table.  Garden salad should be served sans dressing, with multiple bottled dressings standing alongside the salad bowl ‘cuz, “that’s how I had it growing up ”  (Never mind that whenI was growing up, bottles on the table were worse than elbows.)  Even the salad itself should be boring, made with iceberg lettuce.  ICEBERG!  No colorful fruit slices, exotic greens, toasted nuts or onions of any color except white, in this nostalgic salad of his childhood. 

 

Listen, I will gladly love and honor Hubby forever, but I go off when he begs for gefilte fish out of a jar, because .  Granted, he prefers my homemade version – as long as it’s plated exactly the same way as it was when he was growing up – but those jellied fishballs are his unerring default.  To tell the truth, I developed my own addiction to the taste — especially to the jelly itself – but eventually it seemed just too easy.  My grandmother probably went fishing herself for the carp or whatever fish you use to make gefilte fish from scratch; how can I just open a jar?  Yet when I was a new bride – and all thumbs in the kitchen — I stocked up on this wondrous stuff, knowing that it could last unrefrigerated in my pantry until our 50th wedding anniversary.  When friends and relatives would come over to our apartment, Hubby would say, “You have to see this,” and show off our cupboard filled like an aquarium with jars of gefilte fish.  Go figure. 

 

But ever since I learned to cook, I got restless.  More than restless, I got gutsy.  I wanna try new tastes, new ingredients, unusual combinations. 

 

Here is a recipe that takes conventional fare — and adds a few surprises!

 

 

Beef Sukiyaki with Noodles

 

The name says it all!  As far from standard kosher cooking as you can get.  Bring it on!

 

This recipe is adapted from Food & Wine magazine. It called for sake, a traditional Japanese wine fermented from rice; I substituted white wine, as it is hard to find kosher sake.

 

Prep: 9 min, Cook: 15 min, Yield: 8 servings

 

Ingredients:

1 cup soy sauce 1/2 cup white wine 1/2 cup seasoned rice vinegar 4 tablespoons sugar 2 pounds pepper steak strips 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided 2 medium onions, sliced 5 scallions, sliced 1 (6-ounce) package sliced portobello mushrooms 1 (7-ounce) package baby spinach leaves 1 (16-ounce) box fettuccine, cooked according to package directions

 

Preparation:

Mix soy sauce, wine, vinegar and sugar in a small bowl until sugar dissolves; set aside.

Rinse pepper steak and pat dry.

Heat 2 tablespoons of oil in a large, deep skillet over medium heat. Add pepper steak and saut? for 2 to 4 minutes, until almost cooked through. Remove from skillet and set aside.

Add remaining oil to skillet and saut? onions, scallions and mushrooms for 5 minutes.

Add spinach and cook for 1 minute, until wilted.

Return pepper steak to skillet with vegetables and add 3/4 of the soy sauce mixture. Bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, for 1 minute.

Place meat and vegetable mixture in a large warm serving bowl. Add fettuccine and toss. Drizzle with remaining soy mixture before serving.

 

Tips:

The word yaki means “saute” or “grill” in Japanese. The best beef for sukiyaki is a cut that has lots of fat but is still very tender. For a splurge, ask your butcher to slice top chuck French roast into pepper steak-like strips.

About the Author: Jamie Geller was "The Bride Who Knew Nothing" - until she found her niche as everybody's favorite kosher cook next door. She is the author of the best-selling Quick & Kosher cookbook series and creator of the Joy of Kosher with Jamie Geller magazine. Join Jamie and the world's largest kosher food community of joyofkosher.com to discover 5,000 FREE kosher recipes, inspiring menu ideas, how-to videos, and more! Follow more of Jamie's Quick & Kosher cooking adventures on Twitter @JoyofKosher and on facebook.com/joyofkosher.


If you don't see your comment after publishing it, refresh the page.

Our comments section is intended for meaningful responses and debates in a civilized manner. We ask that you respect the fact that we are a religious Jewish website and avoid inappropriate language at all cost.

If you promote any foreign religions, gods or messiahs, lies about Israel, anti-Semitism, or advocate violence (except against terrorists), your permission to comment may be revoked.

No Responses to “Tampering With Traditional Fare”

Comments are closed.

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Current Top Story
caveman cease fire
72 Hour Cease Fire Declared for 8:00AM
Latest Sections Stories
Participants in the Eretz Yisrael Movement July 2014 tour.

It is inspirational to see the average Israeli acting with aplomb and going about daily routines no matter what is happening.

Rally participant wrapped in an Israeli flag.

Participants wore blue and white, waved Israeli flags, and carried pro-Israel posters.

South-Florida-logo

To support the Victor Center for Prevention of Jewish Genetic Diseases at Miami Children’s, please call 305-666-2889 or visit www.mchf.org/donate and select the “Victor Center” fund.

The course will be taught once a month for seven consecutive months and is designed for women at all levels of Jewish knowledge.

Like many of his contemporaries, he went through some hard years, but eventually he earned the rewards of his perseverance and integrity.

The president’s message was one of living peacefully in a Jewish and democratic state, Jews of all stripes unified as brothers, with Arabs or citizens of other religions.

What Hashem desires most is that we learn to connect with each other as children in the same family.

“We are living in a Golden Age of Jewish Art, but don’t know it.”

Spending time in a society as different as the Far East, expands a person’s perspective.

“Whole soybeans,” was the answer. “They have all the advantages of soy without being processed with hexane,” she added.

“Don’t place flowers on a cold gravestone, visit me now…”

The real solution to bullying is to empower the bullied child.

Time outs increases compliance and positive behavior far more than other forms of discipline

More Articles from Jamie Geller
Joy-Of-Kosher-logo

Cooking according to Chanukah tradition doesn’t have to be boring! Though it’s unlikely that any Maccabee ever saw a potato, latkes are traditionally made with potatoes and that particular “traditional” dish is based on a South American tuber that didn’t cross the Atlantic until the sixteenth century.

Joy-Of-Kosher-logo

The all-purpose stovetop to oven skillet is a kitchen essential. Mine works overtime and never lets me down. My skillet and a pair of tongs turn out delicious dinners for my family. Here are three special skillet suppers:

One of the cool benefits of living way north of the GW Bridge and the Big Apple is that we are in real apple country. On a whim, we can take the kids to a local orchard not ten minutes from our house, and become one with nature. It feels just like the olden days – only back then, the farmers would pay hired hands to pick the apples, while we actually pay the farmers to please, please let us harvest their fruit.

I love hosting backyard barbecues on sunny, cloudless days. Hubby at the grill. Me sitting poolside, sipping a pina colada as the kids splash around. After the party’s over, I’ll lounge a while with a novel.

I try to make it a point to work things into my life – including insane schedules, impossible goals and conflicting priorities – in the most upbeat way I can. OK, so it doesn’t always work. What surprises me is how shocked people are when I tell them I just can’t handle everything.

I sometimes — ok, often — envy my friends who cook daring, exotic dishes and throw crazy things like fruit into veggie salads. Innovative stuff like that doesn’t go over so well in my house. I can prepare it, but Hubby will stare down at the unfamiliar thing on his plate with suspicious distaste. He’s a creature of habit, even more so a creature of tradition. Not only does he want to eat the same things, he wants it prepared in the most traditional way. To him, it’s not really Shabbos without classic gefilte fish and chicken soup. And even when its 99 degrees outside, steaming hot cholent and potato kugel better be on the menu.

This is the final cleaning phase and your vacuum cleaner is going to be running all week long! Go over all the bedrooms, living spaces, offices, the dining room, kitchen – every possible area that needs to be vacuumed.

Order your meat now before the prices go up. That’s right, now is the time to get the best deals on Passover meat purchases. And the best part is that you don’t have to take delivery until closer to Passover.

    Latest Poll

    Do you think the FAA ban on US flights to Israel is political?






    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...

Printed from: http://www.jewishpress.com/sections/food/tampering-with-traditional-fare/2010/06/02/

Scan this QR code to visit this page online: